Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

kjc@berkeley.edu
To All,

An internal investigation into the root cause of this incident was conducted.  The link below provides a summary of the actual incident, root cause, and timeline of events.

https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/PIPUB/2014-07-24+IST+Blade+Server+Enclosure+Power+Loss+Summary

If you would like additional details or have any specific questions regarding this incident, please contact me via email or phone.

Kenneth (Joey) Curtis
kjc@berkeley.edu
510-642-8020





Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

Michael Sinatra-3
On 8/12/14 11:29 AM, [hidden email] wrote:

> To All,
>
> An internal investigation into the root cause of this incident was
> conducted.  The link below provides a summary of the actual incident, root
> cause, and timeline of events.
>
> https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/PIPUB/2014-07-24+IST+Blade+Server+Enclosure+Power+Loss+Summary
>
> If you would like additional details or have any specific questions
> regarding this incident, please contact me via email or phone.

"On Thursday July 24, 2014 at 08:05 AM PST, we experienced two specific
power incidents to multiple blade server enclosures that impacted
multiple applications and/or technologies across the campus....The blade
server enclosure power was restored for both issues by 08:37 AM PST, and
the impacted servers, databases, and applications were available by
10:30 AM PST."

If these times really are in PST, then they actually happened an hour
later local time.  So the event really began at 9:05 AM PDT?

If you think this isn't important, imagine someone in Denver trying to
coordinate a meeting between two other people--one in San Francisco and
one in Phoenix.  If the meeting is scheduled for "1pm MST," it means
that the meeting will start at 1 o'clock in San Francisco and Phoenix
(which remains on MST all year) and *2pm* in Denver, which is on MDT.

michael


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] [OT] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

Jon Forrest-3


On 8/12/2014 2:32 PM, Michael Sinatra wrote:
>
> If you think this isn't important, imagine someone in Denver trying to
> coordinate a meeting between two other people--one in San Francisco and
> one in Phoenix.  If the meeting is scheduled for "1pm MST," it means
> that the meeting will start at 1 o'clock in San Francisco and Phoenix
> (which remains on MST all year) and *2pm* in Denver, which is on MDT.

It gets worse. Some counties in Kentucky observe Daylight
Savings Time, and some don't. So you always have to make
sure you and the person you're talking to know which
time you're talking about, even when you're both in the same
state.

So, they have a fascinating way of solving this.
They call Daylight Savings Time "fast time",
and regular time "slow time".

Jon Forrest
UCB (ret.)


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] [OT] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

secabeen
Generally, if you don't care, just use the Two-Letter Abbreviation
(PT/MT/CT/ET).  Humans can tell what that means.  Computers can't,
because for 1 hour a year, the Two-Letter Abbreviation is not unique,
but the rest of the time, it is.

--Ted

On 8/12/2014 2:57 PM, Jon Forrest wrote:

>
>
> On 8/12/2014 2:32 PM, Michael Sinatra wrote:
>>
>> If you think this isn't important, imagine someone in Denver trying to
>> coordinate a meeting between two other people--one in San Francisco and
>> one in Phoenix.  If the meeting is scheduled for "1pm MST," it means
>> that the meeting will start at 1 o'clock in San Francisco and Phoenix
>> (which remains on MST all year) and *2pm* in Denver, which is on MDT.
>
> It gets worse. Some counties in Kentucky observe Daylight
> Savings Time, and some don't. So you always have to make
> sure you and the person you're talking to know which
> time you're talking about, even when you're both in the same
> state.
>
> So, they have a fascinating way of solving this.
> They call Daylight Savings Time "fast time",
> and regular time "slow time".
>
> Jon Forrest
> UCB (ret.)
>
>
>  
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>

 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] [OT] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

Philip Weekly
Best practice is to use GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) time to avoid any
confusion.

Best,

Philip


-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ted Cabeen
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2014 3:01 PM
To: Jon Forrest; [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] [OT] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident
07/24/2014

Generally, if you don't care, just use the Two-Letter Abbreviation
(PT/MT/CT/ET).  Humans can tell what that means.  Computers can't, because
for 1 hour a year, the Two-Letter Abbreviation is not unique, but the rest
of the time, it is.

--Ted

On 8/12/2014 2:57 PM, Jon Forrest wrote:
>
>
> On 8/12/2014 2:32 PM, Michael Sinatra wrote:
>>
>> If you think this isn't important, imagine someone in Denver trying
>> to coordinate a meeting between two other people--one in San
>> Francisco and one in Phoenix.  If the meeting is scheduled for "1pm
>> MST," it means that the meeting will start at 1 o'clock in San
>> Francisco and Phoenix (which remains on MST all year) and *2pm* in
Denver, which is on MDT.

>
> It gets worse. Some counties in Kentucky observe Daylight Savings
> Time, and some don't. So you always have to make sure you and the
> person you're talking to know which time you're talking about, even
> when you're both in the same state.
>
> So, they have a fascinating way of solving this.
> They call Daylight Savings Time "fast time", and regular time "slow
> time".
>
> Jon Forrest
> UCB (ret.)
>
>
>  
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> --- The following was automatically added to this message by the list
> server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>

 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] [OT] Incident Summary - Blade Server Power Incident 07/24/2014

Jack Burris
In reply to this post by secabeen
UTC is always the same time, everywhere, all the time.  No Daylight "Savings" Time, no political ineptness, no trying to be different . . . it's just a time most everyone can agree upon.  :)

ciao,
Jack Burris
D-Lab


On Tue, Aug 12, 2014 at 3:01 PM, Ted Cabeen <[hidden email]> wrote:
Generally, if you don't care, just use the Two-Letter Abbreviation
(PT/MT/CT/ET).  Humans can tell what that means.  Computers can't,
because for 1 hour a year, the Two-Letter Abbreviation is not unique,
but the rest of the time, it is.

--Ted

On 8/12/2014 2:57 PM, Jon Forrest wrote:
>
>
> On 8/12/2014 2:32 PM, Michael Sinatra wrote:
>>
>> If you think this isn't important, imagine someone in Denver trying to
>> coordinate a meeting between two other people--one in San Francisco and
>> one in Phoenix.  If the meeting is scheduled for "1pm MST," it means
>> that the meeting will start at 1 o'clock in San Francisco and Phoenix
>> (which remains on MST all year) and *2pm* in Denver, which is on MDT.
>
> It gets worse. Some counties in Kentucky observe Daylight
> Savings Time, and some don't. So you always have to make
> sure you and the person you're talking to know which
> time you're talking about, even when you're both in the same
> state.
>
> So, they have a fascinating way of solving this.
> They call Daylight Savings Time "fast time",
> and regular time "slow time".
>
> Jon Forrest
> UCB (ret.)
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.



--

----------------------------

Question (your own) authority


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.