[Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

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[Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

Devin Jones
By popular demand, the topic for April is Open-source Hardware.

This is the fourth topic in the 12 Things in 12 Months series, where
the big idea is to engage new technologies without a huge time
commitment (and I'm also sending this to micronet, since this topic will
appeal to an audience beyond the software developers and friends on appnet).

The open-source hardware movement brings the hobbyist-electronics
experience into the 21st century, with all the LEDs, resistors and
capacitors you loved as a child, adding integrated circuit chips,
sensors, actuators, and more.

After years of coding in text editors and shells, it's oddly satisfying
to de-code color bands on resistors and make an LED blink.  The Arduino
is a popular and cheap controller where you can use off-the-shelf
modules to gather data from the physical world like light, distance,
temperature, movement, route it all through program logic (in a breezy
variant of Java/processing), and then affect physical world things like
servos and displays.  A huge collection of kits are available, but the
finished project is limited only to your imagination.

This April, join us in an exploration of open-source hardware here:

https://calmail.berkeley.edu/manage/list/listinfo/arduino
@lists.berkeley.edu

(A separate list to reduce noise on the main list.)

Like prior months, this will be 90% self-directed learning
with the list as a place to share notes.  A resources page is coming
together here:

https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/webdevs/12+Things+-+Opensource+Hardware

To fully participate this month, you will want to pick up a kit, see the
page above for suggestions.

The physical artifacts are fun to show off, so we'll set up at least one
meeting for show and tell.  I'm also reaching out to the local
hackerspace community to see if we can arrange for an on-campus demo or
possibly a field trip.

Next month, we're planning to explore git.  More info and potential
topics here:
https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/webdevs/12+Things+in+12+Months

-Devin

 
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Re: [Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

Michael Green
Devin,

If someone is interested in making something that is outside and wants
to be connected to the campus network, we will make a WiMax <-> WiFi
hotspot available.  We have WiMax on campus (Wurster) and have a limited
number of the battery powered hotspots.  The WiMax service is new,
scruffy, poorly supported, and may or may not work.  Before the term
lost its meaning, this would have been labeled beta, perhaps even late
alpha.  It will probably work, and we will try to make it work if it
fails, but not in the same way that we support the regular campus
network.  The WiMax <-> WiFi hotspots don't seem to perform that well
inside buildings, but if you are near a window, who knows, the radio
spirits may look favorably upon you.

The WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot is battery powered, which opens up quite a
few possibilities.  If your device has line of site to Wurster, 1Mb/s
should be easily achievable.  Perhaps a remotely steered robot with a
camera that drives around Memorial Glade, a WiFi to Zigbee sensor
network monitoring something in the area, or some Internet attached
art.  Our preference is to configure the WiFi for WPA2 with a pre-shared
key.  Looking at Sparkfun, I see that the WiFly Shield can handle WPA2.  
Robotshop has a Cupperhead WiFi Shield that also seems to be WPA2
friendly.  CuteDigi has a WiShield that lists WPA2 as supported.  WPA2
does not seem to be a problem for WiFi shields.

There are no direct charges associated with this service.  There are
just lots of nerds inside Telecommunications that like Arduinos, robots,
art, and things that are connected to the Internet.  If someone decides
to use this service, remember to be nice to the nerds.  They are trying
to keep this service running while their evil director continues to pile
on projects.

Michael Green
Telecommunications Director
UC Berkeley
510-642-2039
Full contact information: https://calnet.calnet.berkeley.edu/directory/details.pl?uid=232652


On 3/27/2012 2:05 PM, Devin Jones wrote:

> By popular demand, the topic for April is Open-source Hardware.
>
> This is the fourth topic in the 12 Things in 12 Months series, where
> the big idea is to engage new technologies without a huge time
> commitment (and I'm also sending this to micronet, since this topic will
> appeal to an audience beyond the software developers and friends on appnet).
>
> The open-source hardware movement brings the hobbyist-electronics
> experience into the 21st century, with all the LEDs, resistors and
> capacitors you loved as a child, adding integrated circuit chips,
> sensors, actuators, and more.
>
> After years of coding in text editors and shells, it's oddly satisfying
> to de-code color bands on resistors and make an LED blink.  The Arduino
> is a popular and cheap controller where you can use off-the-shelf
> modules to gather data from the physical world like light, distance,
> temperature, movement, route it all through program logic (in a breezy
> variant of Java/processing), and then affect physical world things like
> servos and displays.  A huge collection of kits are available, but the
> finished project is limited only to your imagination.
>
> This April, join us in an exploration of open-source hardware here:
>
> https://calmail.berkeley.edu/manage/list/listinfo/arduino
> @lists.berkeley.edu
>
> (A separate list to reduce noise on the main list.)
>
> Like prior months, this will be 90% self-directed learning
> with the list as a place to share notes.  A resources page is coming
> together here:
>
> https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/webdevs/12+Things+-+Opensource+Hardware
>
> To fully participate this month, you will want to pick up a kit, see the
> page above for suggestions.
>
> The physical artifacts are fun to show off, so we'll set up at least one
> meeting for show and tell.  I'm also reaching out to the local
> hackerspace community to see if we can arrange for an on-campus demo or
> possibly a field trip.
>
> Next month, we're planning to explore git.  More info and potential
> topics here:
> https://wikihub.berkeley.edu/display/webdevs/12+Things+in+12+Months
>
> -Devin
>
>
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> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 
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Re: [Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

Michael Sinatra-3
On 3/29/12 8:37 AM, Michael Green wrote:

> The WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot is battery powered, which opens up quite a
> few possibilities.  If your device has line of site to Wurster, 1Mb/s
> should be easily achievable.  Perhaps a remotely steered robot with a
> camera that drives around Memorial Glade, a WiFi to Zigbee sensor
> network monitoring something in the area, or some Internet attached
> art.  Our preference is to configure the WiFi for WPA2 with a pre-shared
> key.  Looking at Sparkfun, I see that the WiFly Shield can handle WPA2.  
> Robotshop has a Cupperhead WiFi Shield that also seems to be WPA2
> friendly.  CuteDigi has a WiShield that lists WPA2 as supported.  WPA2
> does not seem to be a problem for WiFi shields.

Michael,

Do you think we can leverage the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspots to provision
full campus Tacocopter service?  It seems to me that this would be a
win-win for the campus food service ecosystem.  I think there are
synergistic methodologies we could bring to bear in architecting an
OE-TSS (OE Tacocopter Service Solution), but it requires some serious
outside-the-box thinking--again, obviously an OE project.  The
Tacocopter is clearly a disruptive technology with an obvious
transformative impact on student, faculty, and staff bandwidth (and
probably other widths).  With a small up-front investment, I predict a
$7m in yearly Tacocopter-related savings.

It seems to me that the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot could easily provide the
foundational substrate to grow a sustainable Tacocopter service delivery
methodology.  Going forward, I'd be interested in your thoughts about
this.  Feel free to reach out to me, otherwise I'll circle back and sync
up with you regarding the business plan.

michael

 
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Re: [Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

John D. MacDonald
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA512

Michaels,

I'll see what I can do to get this folded into an OE initiative
(because I have that kind of sway).  The big question is, should it be
part of Productivity Suite, or High Performance Culture?

Thanks for your thoughts,
John



On 3/29/2012 9:56 AM, Michael Sinatra wrote:

> On 3/29/12 8:37 AM, Michael Green wrote:
>
>> The WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot is battery powered, which opens up
>> quite a few possibilities.  If your device has line of site to
>> Wurster, 1Mb/s should be easily achievable.  Perhaps a remotely
>> steered robot with a camera that drives around Memorial Glade, a
>> WiFi to Zigbee sensor network monitoring something in the area,
>> or some Internet attached art.  Our preference is to configure
>> the WiFi for WPA2 with a pre-shared key.  Looking at Sparkfun, I
>> see that the WiFly Shield can handle WPA2. Robotshop has a
>> Cupperhead WiFi Shield that also seems to be WPA2 friendly.
>> CuteDigi has a WiShield that lists WPA2 as supported.  WPA2 does
>> not seem to be a problem for WiFi shields.
>
> Michael,
>
> Do you think we can leverage the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspots to
> provision full campus Tacocopter service?  It seems to me that this
> would be a win-win for the campus food service ecosystem.  I think
> there are synergistic methodologies we could bring to bear in
> architecting an OE-TSS (OE Tacocopter Service Solution), but it
> requires some serious outside-the-box thinking--again, obviously an
> OE project.  The Tacocopter is clearly a disruptive technology with
> an obvious transformative impact on student, faculty, and staff
> bandwidth (and probably other widths).  With a small up-front
> investment, I predict a $7m in yearly Tacocopter-related savings.
>
> It seems to me that the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot could easily provide
> the foundational substrate to grow a sustainable Tacocopter service
> delivery methodology.  Going forward, I'd be interested in your
> thoughts about this.  Feel free to reach out to me, otherwise I'll
> circle back and sync up with you regarding the business plan.
>
> michael
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or
> unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about
> upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and
> world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched
> on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among
> others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have
> known you in the past.

- --
- -

===================================
 John D. MacDonald
 Information Systems Architect

 UC Berkeley School of Law - IS&T
 366 Boalt Hall
 510-642-7191
===================================









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Re: [Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

Ryan Lovett
In reply to this post by Michael Sinatra-3
On Thu, Mar 29, 2012 at 09:56:59AM -0700, Michael Sinatra wrote:

> Do you think we can leverage the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspots to provision
> full campus Tacocopter service?  It seems to me that this would be a
> win-win for the campus food service ecosystem.  I think there are
> synergistic methodologies we could bring to bear in architecting an
> OE-TSS (OE Tacocopter Service Solution), but it requires some serious
> outside-the-box thinking--again, obviously an OE project.  The
> Tacocopter is clearly a disruptive technology with an obvious
> transformative impact on student, faculty, and staff bandwidth (and
> probably other widths).  With a small up-front investment, I predict a
> $7m in yearly Tacocopter-related savings.
>
> It seems to me that the WiMax <-> WiFi hotspot could easily provide the
> foundational substrate to grow a sustainable Tacocopter service delivery
> methodology.  Going forward, I'd be interested in your thoughts about
> this.  Feel free to reach out to me, otherwise I'll circle back and sync
> up with you regarding the business plan.

How would this service benefit all those who would choose Pizzagliders? Any
investigation into cloud-resident aerostats should consider *all*
stakeholders of best-in-class mobile deliverables. (even if the service
doesn't actually exist yet)

Ryan

 
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Re: [Micronet] 12 things in 12 months - Open-source Hardware (Arduino)

Graham Patterson
In reply to this post by Michael Sinatra-3

Considering the likely heavy demand from grad students, shift workers,
and all-night study periods, a twenty-four hour service seems
reasonable. However the current OE aims suggest that service after 6pm
would have to be out-sourced to a fly-by-night specialist company.

Graham

On 3/29/12 9:56 AM, Michael Sinatra wrote:

> On 3/29/12 8:37 AM, Michael Green wrote:
>
>> The WiMax<->  WiFi hotspot is battery powered, which opens up quite a
>> few possibilities.  If your device has line of site to Wurster, 1Mb/s
>> should be easily achievable.  Perhaps a remotely steered robot with a
>> camera that drives around Memorial Glade, a WiFi to Zigbee sensor
>> network monitoring something in the area, or some Internet attached
>> art.  Our preference is to configure the WiFi for WPA2 with a pre-shared
>> key.  Looking at Sparkfun, I see that the WiFly Shield can handle WPA2.
>> Robotshop has a Cupperhead WiFi Shield that also seems to be WPA2
>> friendly.  CuteDigi has a WiShield that lists WPA2 as supported.  WPA2
>> does not seem to be a problem for WiFi shields.
>
> Michael,
>
> Do you think we can leverage the WiMax<->  WiFi hotspots to provision
> full campus Tacocopter service?  It seems to me that this would be a
> win-win for the campus food service ecosystem.  I think there are
> synergistic methodologies we could bring to bear in architecting an
> OE-TSS (OE Tacocopter Service Solution), but it requires some serious
> outside-the-box thinking--again, obviously an OE project.  The
> Tacocopter is clearly a disruptive technology with an obvious
> transformative impact on student, faculty, and staff bandwidth (and
> probably other widths).  With a small up-front investment, I predict a
> $7m in yearly Tacocopter-related savings.
>
> It seems to me that the WiMax<->  WiFi hotspot could easily provide the
> foundational substrate to grow a sustainable Tacocopter service delivery
> methodology.  Going forward, I'd be interested in your thoughts about
> this.  Feel free to reach out to me, otherwise I'll circle back and sync
> up with you regarding the business plan.
>
> michael
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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