[Micronet] Apple Mail Behaviors

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Re: [Micronet] Apple Mail Behaviors

Guy D. VINSON
The argument that the University is not a business is a bit silly when you look as it currently stands. The University is a business, they sell education, they are not giving it away. The reason the University is recruiting so many out state students is financial and so is raising tuition. The University does countless things for financial reason. The number of IT support staff has been decreasing and the only way to keep up with the support demands is to move to standardized tools and systems. It really doesn't matter if you use a e-mail client for whatever reason if you are doing self support, the burden falls on the person making the choice. But when you have people choosing to use thunderbird/Eudora/Outlook/Applemail and then come crying for help when the client goes walkabout you are affecting a lot more than yourself. I get that some people like having a client because it can do everything but scratch your back and juggle five e-mail accounts while doing it. Why do you need multiple accounts, really the only e-mail account the University should concern itself with it the ones ending in berkeley.edu, Want to use something else then have at it but don't expect support. The argument for supporting 4 or more e-mail clients is equally just as silly... in my opinion. 

Guy Vinson
Computer Support and Consulting
510-842-7199

On Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 2:23 PM, Jon Forrest <[hidden email]> wrote:


On 1/29/2015 2:04 PM, Vivian Sophia wrote:
> Using other clients instead of the web interface results in more extra
> IT time than what it takes for the original setup.

In the administrative areas of the University I'd agree. But,
it's important to remember that UC Berkeley is a university - not an
insurance company. There needs to be room for a massive amount
of variability and experimentation for students and researchers
who choose to move away from the straight and narrow.

> I have also spent huge amounts of time moving mail for people. Ugh.

With IMAP there's no need to move email. That's the whole point of IMAP.

> I get that people have business reasons, sometimes, for using fat mail
> clients. I also see people use them for reasons like unwillingness to
> learn a new way of doing things, without regard to the extra cost to the
> University.

If it were only this simple ... As I, and others, have said, sometimes
it's a question of not wanting to give up features that we have grown
accustomed to that we use daily. For example, show me how to sort my
Gmail by sender, subject, or any of the other columns that Gmail shows
(other than date, which, as far as I know, is the only possibility).

Trying to convince a typical desktop user to move from one program
to another, giving up important features simply to save the University
money, is a hard argument to make.

Cordially,
Jon Forrest
UCB (ret.)


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