[Micronet] Apple Mail - Importing POP message back into Apple Mail

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[Micronet] Apple Mail - Importing POP message back into Apple Mail

Beth Muramoto
I know this might sound like a bconnected question and the problem occurred as a result of setting up bMail on Apple Mail, but I think it's something that might "belong" here as well. If not, I'll skulk away embarrassed and ask bconnected.

Here's the gist of it:

Someone did a bMail set up for a research assistant, not realizing that the person had a POP account. When he deleted the account to create the new bMail IMAP account, it was learned shortly thereafter that everything in the person's "whole LIFE" was in the pop account. Luckily, they had a backup using Time Machine so we got the POP account folder back.

Now, of course, the user wants the thousands upon thousands of email in the account to be imported back into Apple Mail.  I know that you can double click on the .emlx files and open them in Apple Mail. You can read them, reply etc., but obviously the idea of doing that to thousands of messages is beyond not attractive. I googled to find other options, like I tried creating a folder called POPImport in the LIBRARY>MAIL>MAILBOXES, dragging the messages into that folder, hoping to see the folder in Apple Mail to do a  REBUILD, but Apple Mail doesn't see that folder no matter where I put it (IMAP, ON MY MAC etc.).

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to accomplish this or a utility that will convert .emlx files into something I can import into Apple Mail?

Thanks as always and all suggestions welcome.

Beth

--
***********************************************
Beth Muramoto
Computer Resource Specialist
Graduate School of Education
University of California, Berkeley
1650 Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
Phone:  (510) 643-0203 
Fax:  (510) 643-6239

The Formula for Success:  Underpromise, overdeliver.
- Tom Peters

You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things." 

-Stephen Covey

I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. 

-Coleman Cox

***********************************************


 
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Re: [Micronet] Apple Mail - Importing POP message back into Apple Mail

Jason Trout
If you click "Enter Time Machine" while in Apple Mail, you should be able to restore the deleted account's messages directly into the Apple Mail application (your recovered stuff will appear in a local folder called "Restored Messages").  No fussing with emlx files required:-)


-Jason






On Feb 5, 2013, at 9:51 AM, Beth J MURAMOTO <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I know this might sound like a bconnected question and the problem occurred as a result of setting up bMail on Apple Mail, but I think it's something that might "belong" here as well. If not, I'll skulk away embarrassed and ask bconnected.
>
> Here's the gist of it:
>
> Someone did a bMail set up for a research assistant, not realizing that the person had a POP account. When he deleted the account to create the new bMail IMAP account, it was learned shortly thereafter that everything in the person's "whole LIFE" was in the pop account. Luckily, they had a backup using Time Machine so we got the POP account folder back.
>
> Now, of course, the user wants the thousands upon thousands of email in the account to be imported back into Apple Mail.  I know that you can double click on the .emlx files and open them in Apple Mail. You can read them, reply etc., but obviously the idea of doing that to thousands of messages is beyond not attractive. I googled to find other options, like I tried creating a folder called POPImport in the LIBRARY>MAIL>MAILBOXES, dragging the messages into that folder, hoping to see the folder in Apple Mail to do a  REBUILD, but Apple Mail doesn't see that folder no matter where I put it (IMAP, ON MY MAC etc.).
>
> Does anybody have any suggestions on how to accomplish this or a utility that will convert .emlx files into something I can import into Apple Mail?
>
> Thanks as always and all suggestions welcome.
>
> Beth
>
> --
> ***********************************************
> Beth Muramoto
> Computer Resource Specialist
> Graduate School of Education
> University of California, Berkeley
> 1650 Tolman Hall
> Berkeley, CA 94720
> Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
> Phone:  (510) 643-0203
> Fax:  (510) 643-6239
>
> The Formula for Success:  Underpromise, overdeliver.
> - Tom Peters
>
> You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things."
>
> -Stephen Covey
>
> I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.
>
> -Coleman Cox
>
> ***********************************************
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
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The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
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Re: [Micronet] Apple Mail - Importing POP message back into Apple Mail

Jason Trout
In reply to this post by Beth Muramoto
Hi Beth,

It should be in the in the Time Machine drop-down menu in the Mac's menu bar (looks like a little clock with a counterclockwise circular arrow around it).  Once you've entered Time Machine from inside of Mail you can just flip back through the snapshots to the most recent one that has the data you'd like restored.


-Jason




On Feb 6, 2013, at 1:46 PM, Beth J MURAMOTO <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Jason,
>
> Ah, that's cool. So attach the hard drive that has the Time Machine backup and then go into Apple Mail and click on Enter Time Machine? Where would that be and can you control what backup version you want to access?
>
> Beth
>
> On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Jason Trout <[hidden email]> wrote:
> If you click "Enter Time Machine" while in Apple Mail, you should be able to restore the deleted account's messages directly into the Apple Mail application (your recovered stuff will appear in a local folder called "Restored Messages").  No fussing with emlx files required:-)
>
>
> -Jason
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 5, 2013, at 9:51 AM, Beth J MURAMOTO <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > I know this might sound like a bconnected question and the problem occurred as a result of setting up bMail on Apple Mail, but I think it's something that might "belong" here as well. If not, I'll skulk away embarrassed and ask bconnected.
> >
> > Here's the gist of it:
> >
> > Someone did a bMail set up for a research assistant, not realizing that the person had a POP account. When he deleted the account to create the new bMail IMAP account, it was learned shortly thereafter that everything in the person's "whole LIFE" was in the pop account. Luckily, they had a backup using Time Machine so we got the POP account folder back.
> >
> > Now, of course, the user wants the thousands upon thousands of email in the account to be imported back into Apple Mail.  I know that you can double click on the .emlx files and open them in Apple Mail. You can read them, reply etc., but obviously the idea of doing that to thousands of messages is beyond not attractive. I googled to find other options, like I tried creating a folder called POPImport in the LIBRARY>MAIL>MAILBOXES, dragging the messages into that folder, hoping to see the folder in Apple Mail to do a  REBUILD, but Apple Mail doesn't see that folder no matter where I put it (IMAP, ON MY MAC etc.).
> >
> > Does anybody have any suggestions on how to accomplish this or a utility that will convert .emlx files into something I can import into Apple Mail?
> >
> > Thanks as always and all suggestions welcome.
> >
> > Beth
> >
> > --
> > ***********************************************
> > Beth Muramoto
> > Computer Resource Specialist
> > Graduate School of Education
> > University of California, Berkeley
> > 1650 Tolman Hall
> > Berkeley, CA 94720
> > Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
> > Phone:  (510) 643-0203
> > Fax:  (510) 643-6239
> >
> > The Formula for Success:  Underpromise, overdeliver.
> >                               - Tom Peters
> >
> > You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things."
> >
> >                               -Stephen Covey
> >
> > I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.
> >
> >                               -Coleman Cox
> >
> > ***********************************************
> >
> >
> > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
> >
> > To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
> >
> > http://micronet.berkeley.edu
> >
> > Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
>
> --
> ***********************************************
> Beth Muramoto
> Computer Resource Specialist
> Graduate School of Education
> University of California, Berkeley
> 1650 Tolman Hall
> Berkeley, CA 94720
> Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
> Phone:  (510) 643-0203
> Fax:  (510) 643-6239
>
> The Formula for Success:  Underpromise, overdeliver.
> - Tom Peters
>
> You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things."
>
> -Stephen Covey
>
> I'm a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.
>
> -Coleman Cox
>
> ***********************************************
>


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.