[Micronet] Carbonite

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[Micronet] Carbonite

Jon Johnsen
Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
Carbonite for data backup?

Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?

Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
might there be reasons not to use it anyway?

(We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
enough to have a valid opinion.)

--
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357


 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Seth Novogrodsky
On 9/23/2011 9:35 AM, Jon Johnsen wrote:
Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of 
Carbonite for data backup?

Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?

Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup, 
might there be reasons not to use it anyway?

(We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know 
enough to have a valid opinion.)


I don't know if there is a policy on this, but we are evaluating Mozy Pro.  Mozy is a service similar to what Carbonite offers.  The Pro version has a management console.  (There is also a Carbonite Pro.)

If you are interest in looking at Mozy Pro, the contact information is:

Derrick Walker
MozyPro an EMC Company
Sr. Account Executive
[hidden email]
Direct 801.701.4038
Toll Free 1.877.669.9776 ext 4038

Derrik told me that he has been in touch with IST about the possibility of having Mozy Pro be a "cloud-based" backup solution for the campus.

Seth

-- 
Seth Novogrodsky, Letters & Science Computing Resources
http://ls.berkeley.edu/lscr/who/staff/seth

 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Jon Johnsen
There was a similar discussion on this list regarding DropBox.  The
consensus was that it was best to use local encryption of the data, and then
allow the service to backup the encrypted file(s).  

Specific to DropBox, you designate a file or a folder to sync with your
online account.  So the techique described used a local encryption package
that allows the user to create an encrypted volume on their system that is
seen as a single file by the host OS.  It is this file that is sync'd by the
DropBox service.  This works without having to transfer the entire file each
time since DropBox does block-level comparison/transfers.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu


From: Jon Johnsen
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2011 9:35 AM

Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
Carbonite for data backup?

Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?

Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
might there be reasons not to use it anyway?

(We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
enough to have a valid opinion.)

--
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357


 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Burke Bundy
In reply to this post by Jon Johnsen
Not sure about a specific policy but I would assume that if "sensitive"
data is being backed up many cloud-based backup vendor's solutions may not
be sufficient, at least out of the box.  Vendor's may or may not have
enough flexibility with their solutions to make them appropriate for
backing up sensitive data, but if they do it is likely to be considerably
more expensive than their stock offerings.

We started rolling out CrashPlan Pro Enterprise
(http://www.crashplan.com/enterprise/) this past summer and have been
reasonably content with the product though I would say their support is a
bit weak.  One major benefit of CrashPlan Pro Enterprise is it can be run
locally on one's own servers.  Educational discounts are available.

At one point over the summer I heard that IST was considering rolling out
CrashPlan Pro as a supplementary backup solution for laptops.  Not sure if
this is still in the works or not.  But if it is and it's deployment is
imminent you may be able to persuade your users interested in Carbonite to
wait for the IST Service, assuming it's price competitive with other
solutions.

Burke

> Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
> Carbonite for data backup?
>
> Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?
>
> Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
> might there be reasons not to use it anyway?
>
> (We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
> enough to have a valid opinion.)
>
> --
> Jon Johnsen
> Information Systems Office
> 433 University Hall
> School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
> 510 643-4357
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
> prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>



 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

erol
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
Spideroak is another option similar to Dropbox, but it handles encryption locally before syncing to the server.  Encryption keys are kept on your devices.  You can specific files or folders to sync.  2GB of storage is free.  100GB for $10/month or $100/year.

If you decide to sign up, you can use this link to let them know I referred you and increase my free storage total.


Thanks,

Erol Kepkep



On Sep 23, 2011, at 10:01 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:

There was a similar discussion on this list regarding DropBox.  The
consensus was that it was best to use local encryption of the data, and then
allow the service to backup the encrypted file(s).  

Specific to DropBox, you designate a file or a folder to sync with your
online account.  So the techique described used a local encryption package
that allows the user to create an encrypted volume on their system that is
seen as a single file by the host OS.  It is this file that is sync'd by the
DropBox service.  This works without having to transfer the entire file each
time since DropBox does block-level comparison/transfers.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu


From: Jon Johnsen
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2011 9:35 AM

Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
Carbonite for data backup?

Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?

Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
might there be reasons not to use it anyway?

(We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
enough to have a valid opinion.)

--
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357



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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Walt Hagmaier
In reply to this post by Burke Bundy
IST is currently conducting POCs and evaluations of the major backup vendors (Carbonite, Crashplan, Mozy, etc) for OE.
Please send any feedback( learnings, requirements,etc) to Jack Shnell  [hidden email]

Walt Hagmaier
Sent from my iPad

On Sep 23, 2011, at 10:05 AM, "Burke Bundy" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Not sure about a specific policy but I would assume that if "sensitive"
> data is being backed up many cloud-based backup vendor's solutions may not
> be sufficient, at least out of the box.  Vendor's may or may not have
> enough flexibility with their solutions to make them appropriate for
> backing up sensitive data, but if they do it is likely to be considerably
> more expensive than their stock offerings.
>
> We started rolling out CrashPlan Pro Enterprise
> (http://www.crashplan.com/enterprise/) this past summer and have been
> reasonably content with the product though I would say their support is a
> bit weak.  One major benefit of CrashPlan Pro Enterprise is it can be run
> locally on one's own servers.  Educational discounts are available.
>
> At one point over the summer I heard that IST was considering rolling out
> CrashPlan Pro as a supplementary backup solution for laptops.  Not sure if
> this is still in the works or not.  But if it is and it's deployment is
> imminent you may be able to persuade your users interested in Carbonite to
> wait for the IST Service, assuming it's price competitive with other
> solutions.
>
> Burke
>
>> Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
>> Carbonite for data backup?
>>
>> Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?
>>
>> Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
>> might there be reasons not to use it anyway?
>>
>> (We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
>> enough to have a valid opinion.)
>>
>> --
>> Jon Johnsen
>> Information Systems Office
>> 433 University Hall
>> School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
>> 510 643-4357
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
>> means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
>> prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Jack Shnell
In reply to this post by Burke Bundy

All,


In April, the IST Storage and Backup Group (SBG) produced a survey for OE
comparing leading commercial backup service providers, including Carbonite,
EMC/Mozy and Code42/CrashPlan.  The following table summarizes the findings:

Vendor      Solution/Deployment       Client O/S Supported      Cost per
user  Client Features

NetApp         NAS/Campus         Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris   $25.00/year
N/A                                      

IBM            TSM/Campus         Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris   $36.00/year
E,D,C*
 
EMC           Avamar/Campus       Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris   $37.84/year
E,D

Code 42     CrashPlanPro/Campus   Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris   $42.19/year
E,D,C

Carbonite     Carbonite/Cloud     Windows, Mac                   $48.00/year
E

CommVault     Simpana/Campus      Windows, Mac, Linux            $53.16/year
E,D

EMC            MozyPro/Cloud      Windows, Mac                   $61.05/year
E,D


* E=Encryption, D=Deduplication, C=Compression

Cost per user was calculated in the context of an IST service offering,
using the newly approved Low Tier storage rate, for the campus-deployed
solutions.  The cost also includes $100K/year dedicated FTE (on-campus)
support for every solution.

LBNL administrative IT has an existing contract with Carbonite for their
desktop backups.  Their cost is shown in the table, and reflects a nominal
50 GB/user limit on capacity.  Practically speaking, this limit is not just
about the cost of storage capacity, but also the transfer time required to
restore large amounts of data.  For example, last week I had to download a
couple of ~5 GB files from DropBox (in parallel), and it took two hours to
finish.  Transfer rate limitations, characteristic of commercial cloud
solutions in general, make them much less attractive than campus-hosted
solutions to support backups or data sharing for server-class systems, or
any application that frequently may require quick upload or retrieval of
large volumes of data.

It should be noted that LBL IT is adopting the SBG TSM (UCBackup) service
for all their server-class (and Linux desktop) systems.  SBG is also working
with them on a low cost solution specifically for their high-volume NetApp
filers, that relies on proprietary SnapVault technology.

SBG identified CrashPlanPro (in a campus deployment) as a leading contender
for IST desktop/laptop backup/recovery services, from the standpoint of both
cost and functionality.  The group is currently engaged in POC testing of
the product, with the intent of qualifying a campus wide service offering.


Jack Shnell
Supervisor, Storage and Backup Group
IST Infrastructure Services
642-1188





-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Burke Bundy
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2011 10:05 AM
To: Jon Johnsen
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Not sure about a specific policy but I would assume that if "sensitive"
data is being backed up many cloud-based backup vendor's solutions may not
be sufficient, at least out of the box.  Vendor's may or may not have
enough flexibility with their solutions to make them appropriate for
backing up sensitive data, but if they do it is likely to be considerably
more expensive than their stock offerings.

We started rolling out CrashPlan Pro Enterprise
(http://www.crashplan.com/enterprise/) this past summer and have been
reasonably content with the product though I would say their support is a
bit weak.  One major benefit of CrashPlan Pro Enterprise is it can be run
locally on one's own servers.  Educational discounts are available.

At one point over the summer I heard that IST was considering rolling out
CrashPlan Pro as a supplementary backup solution for laptops.  Not sure if
this is still in the works or not.  But if it is and it's deployment is
imminent you may be able to persuade your users interested in Carbonite to
wait for the IST Service, assuming it's price competitive with other
solutions.

Burke

> Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
> Carbonite for data backup?
>
> Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?
>
> Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
> might there be reasons not to use it anyway?
>
> (We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
> enough to have a valid opinion.)
>
> --
> Jon Johnsen
> Information Systems Office
> 433 University Hall
> School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
> 510 643-4357
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
> prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>



 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by erol

FYI: the “local encryption package”  I mentioned was TrueCrypt.  And nice to see a price reduction announcement from IST for the storage service, right in the middle of a backup discussion - great timing.

 

--

Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst

Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley

164 Chavez Student Center

510-642-5123 office

925-285-1088 cell

asc.berkeley.edu

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2011 11:47 AM

Spideroak is another option similar to Dropbox, but it handles encryption locally before syncing to the server.  Encryption keys are kept on your devices.  You can specific files or folders to sync.  2GB of storage is free.  100GB for $10/month or $100/year.

 

If you decide to sign up, you can use this link to let them know I referred you and increase my free storage total.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Erol Kepkep

 

 

 

On Sep 23, 2011, at 10:01 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:



There was a similar discussion on this list regarding DropBox.  The
consensus was that it was best to use local encryption of the data, and then
allow the service to backup the encrypted file(s).  

Specific to DropBox, you designate a file or a folder to sync with your
online account.  So the techique described used a local encryption package
that allows the user to create an encrypted volume on their system that is
seen as a single file by the host OS.  It is this file that is sync'd by the
DropBox service.  This works without having to transfer the entire file each
time since DropBox does block-level comparison/transfers.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu


From: Jon Johnsen
Sent: Friday, September 23, 2011 9:35 AM

Is there a campus policy which would affect a research unit's use of
Carbonite for data backup?

Would the sensitivity of the backed-up data make a difference?

Assuming that campus policy would allow using Carbonite for data backup,
might there be reasons not to use it anyway?

(We've been asked to give an opinion on this, and we don't feel we know
enough to have a valid opinion.)

--
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357



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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Marilyn Saarni-2
In reply to this post by Jon Johnsen
Just to add comment on Carbonite…we are a dual-institution research center, with facilities both on campus and at LBNL.  

After having tremendous and seemingly unresolvable issues with the UCbackup service (paying for six months of backups with only one successful manual backup for one campus-side lab controller, as well as probably 6-7 FTE days of multiple people trying to make it work on a Windows XP system), when LBNL entered into contract with Carbonite, we quickly moved the campus lab controllers to it.

Installation was extremely user-friendly and simple, the interface is ideal, and we haven't had a single glitch in 6 months.  After the first few hours of initial backup (it backs up only when system isn't active), one is entirely unaware of backups except by the status reports.  We actually TRUST this backup service.  

LBNL's Computer Protection Program does provide advice on securing protected data on your laptop before backing up:

1. Protect your Carbonite credentials. Be aware that your Carbonite account and password information allow web access to data you have backed up.

2. No Personally Identifying Information (PII) of any kind should be backed up with Carbonite. This includes, but is not limited to, Social Security and credit card numbers.

3. Any documents containing passwords should be encrypted separately. Examples include, passwords to other systems, databases, MS Office or SSH keys.

Of course the majority of systems on campus should not be carrying SSNs or credit card numbers on their systems.  Encrypting one's disk would also be appropriate.

We have been told that we have unlimited storage, so I'm uncertain about the 50GB limit mentioned in an earlier email.

I recommend Carbonite especially for travelers and hard-on-their-laptop users, since their backups can be on the fly.  Of course, I recommend redundant backups to laptop users in general -- one external backup at home and one Carbonite is a very nice balance.

Just wanted to provide our own, very positive experience with Carbonite….

- Marilyn
Center for Isotope Geochemistry, UC Berkeley and LBNL

 
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Re: [Micronet] Carbonite

Aaron DuBois
Some of our faculty have been using SugarSync
https://www.sugarsync.com/

They seem to like it as it's fairly easy to use(they don't need
technical help to get going with it on their own), offers them back up
and file syncing from as many computers as they want, and lets them have
access to files while on the road  from any browser should their laptop
be lost or broken. File sharing with the public or with private
individuals is also available.
100GB for $150 year with smaller and larger plans as well.
Client software for mac/pc and many other mobile devices.



On 9/23/2011 1:42 PM, Marilyn Saarni wrote:

> Just to add comment on Carbonite…we are a dual-institution research
> center, with facilities both on campus and at LBNL.
>
> After having tremendous and seemingly unresolvable issues with the
> UCbackup service (paying for six months of backups with only one
> successful manual backup for one campus-side lab controller, as well as
> probably 6-7 FTE days of multiple people trying to make it work on a
> Windows XP system), when LBNL entered into contract with Carbonite, we
> quickly moved the campus lab controllers to it.
>
> Installation was extremely user-friendly and simple, the interface is
> ideal, and we haven't had a single glitch in 6 months. After the first
> few hours of initial backup (it backs up only when system isn't active),
> one is entirely unaware of backups except by the status reports. We
> actually TRUST this backup service.
>
> LBNL's Computer Protection Program does provide advice on securing
> protected data on your laptop before backing up:
>
>> 1. Protect your Carbonite credentials. Be aware that your Carbonite
>> account and password information allow web access to data you have
>> backed up.
>>
>> 2. No Personally Identifying Information (PII) of any kind should be
>> backed up with Carbonite. This includes, but is not limited to, Social
>> Security and credit card numbers.
>>
>> 3. Any documents containing passwords should be encrypted separately.
>> Examples include, passwords to other systems, databases, MS Office or
>> SSH keys.
>
> Of course the majority of systems on campus should not be carrying SSNs
> or credit card numbers on their systems. Encrypting one's disk would
> also be appropriate.
>
> We have been told that we have unlimited storage, so I'm uncertain about
> the 50GB limit mentioned in an earlier email.
>
> I recommend Carbonite especially for travelers and hard-on-their-laptop
> users, since their backups can be on the fly. Of course, I recommend
> redundant backups to laptop users in general -- one external backup at
> home and one Carbonite is a very nice balance.
>
> Just wanted to provide our own, very positive experience with Carbonite….
>
> - Marilyn
> Center for Isotope Geochemistry, UC Berkeley and LBNL
>
>
>
>
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>
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>
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--
Aaron DuBois
Sociology Tech
489 Barrows Hall
Mon-Thur 10:30am-5:00pm
Fri 8:30-am-3pm
510-643-9389
Department Web Master
Department IST Security Officer
Department Equipment Custodian
CalNet Deputy

 
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[Micronet] Spideroak vs Sugarsync

erol
Sugarsync works quite well and it's fairly easy to use for a novice user, but for data protection, files must be encrypted first with another utility.  

Spideroak is not as as simple to start using, but it is quite versatile and the encryption is done automatically on your device prior to syncing to the server.  It works on multiple devices, and most platforms including mac, PC, many Linux, iOS, and Android.  Files can be shared with others.  If you want more storage, it's $100/yr/100GB (less than Sugarsync but it starts at 100GB).   Once you learn to use it, the interface is generally the same on all platforms, and you can access your files through their web interface as well.


The main reason I went to it is the automatic encryption at the device.  I'm not syncing very much, so the 2GB free is working for me.  A few more GB wouldn't hurt though.  Please use this referral link if you decide to join to bump up my free quota.  


Cheers!

Erol


On Sep 23, 2011, at 2:01 PM, Aaron DuBois wrote:

Some of our faculty have been using SugarSync
https://www.sugarsync.com/

They seem to like it as it's fairly easy to use(they don't need
technical help to get going with it on their own), offers them back up
and file syncing from as many computers as they want, and lets them have
access to files while on the road  from any browser should their laptop
be lost or broken. File sharing with the public or with private
individuals is also available.
100GB for $150 year with smaller and larger plans as well.
Client software for mac/pc and many other mobile devices.





 
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