[Micronet] Confusing Samba Issue

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[Micronet] Confusing Samba Issue

Jon Forrest
I'm running Samba 3.0.33-3.29.el5_5 on a CentOS 5.5 machine.
I'm connecting to it from a Windows 7 SP1 machine. I'm using
security = user and passdb backend = tdbsam . Everything
works fine until I move the Windows machine to an IP address
on another subnet. All networking functions still work fine
on the new subnet except Samba so it's clear there is no
TCP/IP problem.

On the old subnet when I map the network drive I'm asked
for a password. I give a password which is accepted and then
I see a folder from the network share. I can open any file.
When I'm on the new subnet I'm *not* asked for a password
even though I give the '/user' option on the "net use" command
line. Then I see the folder from the network share but
I can't open any files or directories. It's as if I'm being
seen as a different user. I've turned off firewalls on
both the Linux and the Windows machine but this didn't
make any difference.

What's also strange about this is that when I try connecting
to the Samba share from yet another Windows 7 computer on yet
another subnet, after adding it to the "hosts allow" section,
then everything works fine.

Does anybody have any idea what I'm doing wrong?

Cordially,
--
Jon Forrest
Research Computing Support
College of Chemistry
173 Tan Hall
University of California Berkeley
Berkeley, CA
94720-1460
510-643-1032
[hidden email]

 
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