[Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

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[Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Graham Patterson
We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
combine it.

There is some information in
http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.

The numbers in this report are startling (to me).


Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.

"During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
is unclear. Thanks."


Graham
--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Alex Warren
Didn't those NOVAs have hamsters on wheels that make the gears grind to
get the punch cards out?

Alex Warren
CED IIT
University of California, Berkeley
485 Wurster Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 295-5714

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Graham
Patterson
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 11:32 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any
information?

We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened), so
if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to combine
it.

There is some information in
http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB service.
This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.

The numbers in this report are startling (to me).


Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.

"During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini computer
I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that is unclear.
Thanks."


Graham
--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.


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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Bruce Lorenzen
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson
In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch a replacement card and resubmit....

When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.  There were a few other stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and print your papers.  If they were full, you used a typewriter. 

Bruce

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]> wrote:
We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
combine it.

There is some information in
http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.

The numbers in this report are startling (to me).


Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.

"During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
is unclear. Thanks."


Graham
--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   <a href="tel:510-643-1984" value="+15106431984">510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.


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--
Bruce Lorenzen, RCDD
Manager, Design & Project Management
University of California, Berkeley
2484 Shattuck Ave.
Berkeley, CA  94720-1640 

Office:  510.643.0883
Mobile:  510.406.8476

http://ist.berkeley.edu/telecom

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

David Rieger

Word is you could jump the queue of the IBM 360 in Evans by setting off a fire alarm which would cause processing of those punch cards to stop. You could them sneak your card deck ahead of others.

(Told to me by an Old Blue at the RSF).

On Jan 21, 2016 3:29 PM, "Bruce Lorenzen" <[hidden email]> wrote:
In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch a replacement card and resubmit....

When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.  There were a few other stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and print your papers.  If they were full, you used a typewriter. 

Bruce

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]> wrote:
We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
combine it.

There is some information in
http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.

The numbers in this report are startling (to me).


Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.

"During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
is unclear. Thanks."


Graham
--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   <a href="tel:510-643-1984" value="+15106431984" target="_blank">510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.


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--
Bruce Lorenzen, RCDD
Manager, Design & Project Management
University of California, Berkeley
2484 Shattuck Ave.
Berkeley, CA  94720-1640 

Office:  <a href="tel:510.643.0883" value="+15106430883" target="_blank">510.643.0883
Mobile:  <a href="tel:510.406.8476" value="+15104068476" target="_blank">510.406.8476

http://ist.berkeley.edu/telecom


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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Aron Roberts
In reply to this post by Bruce Lorenzen
On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Bruce Lorenzen <[hidden email]> wrote:
> When I came back in 81 to 83 ...There were a few other
> stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and
> print your papers.

For a look back at the state of central systems and public access
computer labs as of circa Summer to Fall 1984, see p. 11 of the
1984-85 General Catalog:

http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/generalcatalog/text/1984_1985_intro.pdf

"At the time this Catalog was prepared, the campus computer network
used for instruction and research included a large IBM VM/CMS system,
about 50 DEC VAX UNIX systems, a Data General system, a CDC system at
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, various popular microcomputers, and
plotters, printers, and typesetters. The campus computing network Is
connected to several national electronic networks.

"The campus has hundreds of terminals and microcomputers for academic
work. Computing Affairs maintains terminal rooms in Evans Hall, Davis
Hall, Moffitt Library, and other locations; these facilities can be
used by any member of the University community. Microcomputer
facilities for use by individuals and by scheduled classes are being
constructed in Tolman Hall and Wheeler Hall."

Aron Roberts
Research IT
(and a staff member at the Tolman Microcomputer Facility during its
earliest years)

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Bruce Lorenzen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on
> the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn
> in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program
> compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch
> a replacement card and resubmit....
>
> When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the
> basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of
> those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.  There were a few other
> stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and
> print your papers.  If they were full, you used a typewriter.
>
> Bruce
>
> On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
>> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
>> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
>> combine it.
>>
>> There is some information in
>> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
>> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
>> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>>
>> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>>
>>
>> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
>> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>>
>> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
>> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
>> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
>> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
>> is unclear. Thanks."
>>
>>
>> Graham
>> --
>> Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
>> Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
>> "...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
>> puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
>> [hidden email] list.
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Bruce Lorenzen, RCDD
> Manager, Design & Project Management
> University of California, Berkeley
> 2484 Shattuck Ave.
> Berkeley, CA  94720-1640
>
> Office:  510.643.0883
> Mobile:  510.406.8476
>
> http://ist.berkeley.edu/telecom
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
> [hidden email] list.
>

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Aron Roberts
Interestingly, earlier introductions to the campus's General Catalog
have been archived and made available by The Library using that same
URL pattern; e.g. for 1978-79:

http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/generalcatalog/text/1978_1979_intro.pdf

"Computer Facilities and Operations provides computing hardware,
software and operational services for instructional, research and
administrative purposes. Operations manages computing facilities, such
as a CDC 6400 batch system and seven remote job-entry stations, Unix
time sharing systems on several PDF 11/70's (two are linked to the
6400), two PDP 11/34's, an IBM 370/115 for campus administrative use,
a Decision Basic system for introductory programming, two stand alone
"one-on-one" personal computers (a Tektronix 4051 and an IBM 5100),
and remote job entry extensions to U.C. San Francisco and U.C.L.A."

I took a very quick look at the introduction to the 1977-78 General
Catalog, but wasn't able to find computing facilities mentioned in
that year's Catalog ...

Aron

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:45 PM, Aron Roberts
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Bruce Lorenzen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> When I came back in 81 to 83 ...There were a few other
>> stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and
>> print your papers.
>
> For a look back at the state of central systems and public access
> computer labs as of circa Summer to Fall 1984, see p. 11 of the
> 1984-85 General Catalog:
>
> http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/generalcatalog/text/1984_1985_intro.pdf
>
> "At the time this Catalog was prepared, the campus computer network
> used for instruction and research included a large IBM VM/CMS system,
> about 50 DEC VAX UNIX systems, a Data General system, a CDC system at
> Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, various popular microcomputers, and
> plotters, printers, and typesetters. The campus computing network Is
> connected to several national electronic networks.
>
> "The campus has hundreds of terminals and microcomputers for academic
> work. Computing Affairs maintains terminal rooms in Evans Hall, Davis
> Hall, Moffitt Library, and other locations; these facilities can be
> used by any member of the University community. Microcomputer
> facilities for use by individuals and by scheduled classes are being
> constructed in Tolman Hall and Wheeler Hall."
>
> Aron Roberts
> Research IT
> (and a staff member at the Tolman Microcomputer Facility during its
> earliest years)
>
> On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Bruce Lorenzen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on
>> the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn
>> in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program
>> compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch
>> a replacement card and resubmit....
>>
>> When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the
>> basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of
>> those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.  There were a few other
>> stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and
>> print your papers.  If they were full, you used a typewriter.
>>
>> Bruce
>>
>> On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
>>> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
>>> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
>>> combine it.
>>>
>>> There is some information in
>>> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
>>> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
>>> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>>>
>>> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>>>
>>>
>>> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
>>> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>>>
>>> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
>>> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
>>> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
>>> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
>>> is unclear. Thanks."
>>>
>>>
>>> Graham
>>> --
>>> Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
>>> Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
>>> "...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
>>> puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.
>>>
>>>
>>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>>
>>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>>
>>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>>
>>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
>>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>>
>>> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
>>> [hidden email] list.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Bruce Lorenzen, RCDD
>> Manager, Design & Project Management
>> University of California, Berkeley
>> 2484 Shattuck Ave.
>> Berkeley, CA  94720-1640
>>
>> Office:  510.643.0883
>> Mobile:  510.406.8476
>>
>> http://ist.berkeley.edu/telecom
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
>> [hidden email] list.
>>

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Mike Friedman
In reply to this post by Aron Roberts
On 2016-01-21 15:45, Aron Roberts wrote:

> "At the time this Catalog was prepared, the campus computer network
> used for instruction and research included a large IBM VM/CMS system,

Don't get me started :-) .  From 1980 until 1994 I was a systems
programmer in IST (working in Evans Hall) supporting the VM/CMS
operating system.  (I also was in the MVS systems group during the same
period).  Much of what we take for granted today, technologically, would
have been considered science fiction at that time.  I recall, sometime
in the late 70s (I was still an applications programmer, also in Evans,
pre-IST), seeing articles in the industry press about work being done on
so-called "cellular" phones that would actually allow you to move around
over long distances while engaged in a phone conversation!  (And I
remember hoping I would live long enough to have one of those things).
Even in the mid 90s, by which time I was in CNS, we were playing around
with a wireless connection of our laptops to the campus network.  I
could actually walk down the hall with my laptop without losing my
network connectivity (for a few yards anyway).

As I managed to save a good percentage of my email beginning in 1980, I
am able to remind myself of this history whenever I'm afflicted with
nostalgia.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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gts
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

gts
In reply to this post by Bruce Lorenzen
Bruce,

Probably the machine you were using in 1971 was the CDC 6400 System either in the basement of Campbell Hall or Evans Hall (can't remember when exactly we moved, Evans was built in 1971). There was also a small IBM 360 in the basement, but as I remember it was used by Administration.

http://gsmall.us/Computing/CDC6400.html

greg

At 03:29 PM 1/21/2016, Bruce Lorenzen wrote:
>In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch a replacement card and resubmit....


 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Aron Roberts
In reply to this post by Bruce Lorenzen
Bruce wrote:
> When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.

Those blue terminals *might* have been ADM-3s or ADM-3As. An up-close
look at an ADM-3 keyboard (click, if needed, to view full-size image
in your browser):
http://terminals.classiccmp.org/wiki/images/1/17/Lear_Siegler_ADM-3-6.jpg
(from article: http://terminals.classiccmp.org/wiki/index.php/Lear_Siegler_ADM-3)

And a close look at an ADM-3A screen (also click to view full-size):
https://adcurtin.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/2013-10-20-05-39-26.jpg
(from article: https://adcurtin.wordpress.com/2014/01/26/adm3a-ancient-dumb-terminal/)

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 3:29 PM, Bruce Lorenzen <[hidden email]> wrote:

> In 1971 they had an IBM 360 in the basement of Evans.  The current lab on
> the south side was full of key punch machines, duplicators etc.  You'd turn
> in your card deck and come back 4 hours later to see if your program
> compiled - only to find out you left a period off some line of code.  Punch
> a replacement card and resubmit....
>
> When I came back in 81 to 83, the business school had its own DEC in the
> basement of Barrows. It was a miracle - you could do your work from one of
> those blue ascii terminals and get instant results.  There were a few other
> stand-alone labs scattered around campus that you could go to to type in and
> print your papers.  If they were full, you used a typewriter.
>
> Bruce
>
> On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
>> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
>> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
>> combine it.
>>
>> There is some information in
>> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
>> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
>> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>>
>> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>>
>>
>> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
>> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>>
>> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
>> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
>> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
>> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
>> is unclear. Thanks."
>>
>>
>> Graham
>> --
>> Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
>> Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
>> "...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
>> puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.
>>
>>
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>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
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>> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
>> [hidden email] list.
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Bruce Lorenzen, RCDD
> Manager, Design & Project Management
> University of California, Berkeley
> 2484 Shattuck Ave.
> Berkeley, CA  94720-1640
>
> Office:  510.643.0883
> Mobile:  510.406.8476
>
> http://ist.berkeley.edu/telecom
>
>
>
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> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
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> ANNOUNCEMENTS: To send announcements to the Micronet list, please use the
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Al Stangenberger
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson
One striking change in technology has been in the area of optical
character recognition of text.

The first one I remember on campus was a Kurzweil system in Evans, which
cost about $25 per hour -- part of which was used to "train" the scanner
to recognize the peculiarities of the specific material to be scanned.
One of our faculty lost the magnetic tape (and underlying punched cards)
for an important data set and managed to reconstruct the data by having
it scanned off line printer output.

When I finally bought my personal scanner (circa 1999), OmniPage was
distributed with it, and that program is several orders of magnitude
better than what the Kurzweil could do.  That was the 1998 version of
OmniPage!


On 1/21/2016 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson wrote:

> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
> combine it.
>
> There is some information in
> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>
> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>
>
> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>
> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
> is unclear. Thanks."
>
>
> Graham
>

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Aron Roberts
Mike's reminiscences about the wonders of nascent cell phones and
wireless networks, and Al's about late '90s OCR, both recall this
Arthur C. Clarke quote:

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

(This and more:
http://www.clarkefoundation.org/sample-page/sir-arthurs-quotations/)

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Lucy Greco
hello"
 this thread has been  fantastic to read i wish a grad student would take some time to write up the history of computing on  campus by    interviewing  all of you  and more of the people that  made computing here at Berkeley. cheers to all of you that have been here to see us grow and become a community. keep sharing your memorys its otherwise a disk fail when we don't have access to the system your brains all is i love the way you all help us realize that it may be hard today but it would be nothing with out our past. lucy

Lucia Greco
Web Accessibility Evangelist
IST - Architecture, Platforms, and Integration
University of California, Berkeley
(510) 289-6008 skype: lucia1-greco
http://webaccess.berkeley.edu
Follow me on twitter @accessaces


On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 8:03 PM, Aron Roberts <[hidden email]> wrote:
Mike's reminiscences about the wonders of nascent cell phones and
wireless networks, and Al's about late '90s OCR, both recall this
Arthur C. Clarke quote:

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

(This and more:
http://www.clarkefoundation.org/sample-page/sir-arthurs-quotations/)


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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

aj craft
Thanks for starting this thread Graham. I agree with Lucy, it has been a great read. 

I did some searching and found this article, written in 1998 for the Hall's 30th anniversary, which talks about the Hall's 1970's "Friday Project", connecting kids with computers. Unfortunately it doesn't name the type of computer system we had back then, but it's a great read. Many of these people went on to lead distinguished careers in scientific fields.


AJ Craft
Technical Project Manager
Center for Technology Innovation
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley
510-643-1984 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 10:52 AM, Lucy Greco <[hidden email]> wrote:
hello"
 this thread has been  fantastic to read i wish a grad student would take some time to write up the history of computing on  campus by    interviewing  all of you  and more of the people that  made computing here at Berkeley. cheers to all of you that have been here to see us grow and become a community. keep sharing your memorys its otherwise a disk fail when we don't have access to the system your brains all is i love the way you all help us realize that it may be hard today but it would be nothing with out our past. lucy

Lucia Greco
Web Accessibility Evangelist
IST - Architecture, Platforms, and Integration
University of California, Berkeley
<a href="tel:%28510%29%20289-6008" value="+15102896008" target="_blank">(510) 289-6008 skype: lucia1-greco
http://webaccess.berkeley.edu
Follow me on twitter @accessaces


On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 8:03 PM, Aron Roberts <[hidden email]> wrote:
Mike's reminiscences about the wonders of nascent cell phones and
wireless networks, and Al's about late '90s OCR, both recall this
Arthur C. Clarke quote:

"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

(This and more:
http://www.clarkefoundation.org/sample-page/sir-arthurs-quotations/)


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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Graham Patterson
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson

Looks like it may have been an HP 2000B

http://www.hpmuseum.net/display_item.php?hw=411

The NOVA was succeeded by an HP. The 2000B had a list price somewhere
between $50,000 and $90,000 from the referenced site. That site is
Australian, so this may be AUS$ prices.

Those things ran magnetic core memory, up to a massive (!) 32K words.

Graham


On 1/21/16 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson wrote:

> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
> combine it.
>
> There is some information in
> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>
> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>
>
> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>
> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
> is unclear. Thanks."
>
>
> Graham
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Graham Patterson
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson


The Wikipedia information is interesting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Hall_of_Science but we do not
have verification.

Graham


On 1/21/16 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson wrote:

> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
> combine it.
>
> There is some information in
> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>
> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>
>
> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>
> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
> is unclear. Thanks."
>
>
> Graham
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.

 
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Kathleen Valerio
My sister worked in at the Lawrence Hall of science back in the day maybe I'll ask her what she remembers - I know we were fascinated as kids that we could make a picture out of letters and punctuation etc. Turns out my brother saved something he made way back when in one of his treasure boxes.  Yes it's amazing how far we've come - and how much we all take for granted every day. 

A thought I had earlier today as I said goodbye to yet another person being laid off at Shared services - is this- the more we animate our systems - the more I wish I could talk to a real person. Not for little things like pulling cash from the bank - but for more complicated things like what the ramifications are for choosing this benefit plan over the other. Reading brochures are just not enough. 


Yours truly, 

Kathleen Valerio, CalPact Coordinator 
CSS Learning & Development

1608 Fourth Street #309-23
Berkeley, CA 94710-7600

Ph 510 664-9737
[hidden email]
@KathleenValeri0

UC Berkeley * reimagines the world *by challenging convention *to shape the future.


On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 12:35 PM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]> wrote:


The Wikipedia information is interesting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Hall_of_Science but we do not
have verification.

Graham


On 1/21/16 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson wrote:
> We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
> our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
> so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
> combine it.
>
> There is some information in
> http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
> 8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
> service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.
>
> The numbers in this report are startling (to me).
>
>
> Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
> http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.
>
> "During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
> namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
> was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
> computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
> is unclear. Thanks."
>
>
> Graham
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Rm 111, Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   <a href="tel:510-643-1984" value="+15106431984">510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.


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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

Jon Johnsen-3
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson
In 1967-69, the primary campus computer was an IBM System 360, 7090/7094, I think in the basement of Campbell.  I used an IBM 1620 in the basement of Birge, after sneaking in to get access, to print punch card decks "created" in one of the T buildings.

Turn around times for the System 360 were many hours during the day, but only an hour or less at 2 or 3 in the morning. So we would stay up most of the night in order to get our simple programs running correctly, running back and forth between the T buildings and the 7090.

Or sneak into Birge and use the 1620 . . .

Jon Johnsen
Richmond, CA


On 1/21/2016 11:32 AM, Graham Patterson wrote:
We received this request via our web contact address, and realized that
our records are incomplete (it is less than ten years after we opened),
so if anyone has any recollections or information we would love to
combine it.

There is some information in
http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED166018.pdf (page 218) that cites an
8 terminal NOVA and later a NOVA 800. The DEC PDP 11/70 was a UCB
service. This is a little earlier than the '75-77 time frame requested.

The numbers in this report are startling (to me).


Ken Roland sent a message using the contact form at
http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/contact-us.

"During 1975-1977 what was the main computing platform at the campus,
namely the Lawrence Hall of Science? My first experience with computers
was there, and I would just like to know what the mainfraime/mini
computer I was using. Its' the last part of my "computer history" that
is unclear. Thanks."


Graham


 
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gts
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Re: [Micronet] For those who have been around a long time...any information?

gts
Hi Jon,

Not quite. The main academic computer from 1967-1982 was the CDC 6400 (in Campbell Hall basement until 1971 then in Evans Hall). From sometime before 1962 the 7040/7090 Direct Couple system, or its predecessor, was the main system (I learned to program on it, FORTRAN/MAP in 1962); it departed about 1967. Then a small System 360 was brought in for administrative computing.

I operated both mainframes in my senior year (1966-1967). The 7040/7090 Direct Couple system was a real computer (actually two computers)! Flashing lights, input switches, and it took a half hour to start up: long card deck to boot, then a tape, and setting switches and waiting for the correct response in the lights, etc. On New Years at midnight we could not restart it because the date processing had a bug. It even had a remote card reader at the Computer Center Library in the T-buildings.

http://www.cozx.com/~dpitts/ibm7090.html (for the picture)
http://gsmall.us/Computing/CDC6400.html

greg

At 06:32 PM 1/22/2016, Jon Johnsen wrote:
In 1967-69, the primary campus computer was an IBM System 360, 7090/7094, I think in the basement of Campbell.  I used an IBM 1620 in the basement of Birge, after sneaking in to get access, to print punch card decks "created" in one of the T buildings.

Turn around times for the System 360 were many hours during the day, but only an hour or less at 2 or 3 in the morning. So we would stay up most of the night in order to get our simple programs running correctly, running back and forth between the T buildings and the 7090.

Or sneak into Birge and use the 1620 . . .

Jon Johnsen
Richmond, CA

 
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