[Micronet] Friday photo: another keypunch

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[Micronet] Friday photo: another keypunch

Al Stangenberger
For those interested in old IBM equipment, here are photos of one of
IBM's early products, the Model 001 Keypunch.  I keep this one in my
office in Mulford for old times' sake.

Herman Hollerith's company (The Tabulating Machine Co.) patented the 001
in 1901.  Tabulating Machine became IBM, and they kept this model number
for the manual keypunch.

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/001.html

An IBM Field Engineer told me that this one was built in 1939 based on
the serial number.  It's a fairly late model since it punches 80-column
cards; earlier versions punched fewer columns on cards.

IBM called their tabulating machine repairmen Field Engineers, and
required them to wear suits or sport coats and ties on their field
calls.  They must have had tremendous dry cleaning bills since the
equipment was full of oil and grease.

I'm told that Forestry used this punch into the early 1960's at our
research forest.

 
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IBM-001-2.jpg (74K) Download Attachment
IBM-001-1.jpg (54K) Download Attachment
gts
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Re: [Micronet] Friday photo: another keypunch

gts
Hi Friday Nostalgia Club,

Anyone pining for the IBM 7090 can still program and run their old sources on Windows or Linux: http://www.cozx.com/~dpitts/ibm7090.html.

greg

At 12:31 AM 5/3/2013, Al Stangenberger wrote:

>For those interested in old IBM equipment, here are photos of one of IBM's early products, the Model 001 Keypunch.  I keep this one in my office in Mulford for old times' sake.
>
>Herman Hollerith's company (The Tabulating Machine Co.) patented the 001 in 1901.  Tabulating Machine became IBM, and they kept this model number for the manual keypunch.
>
>http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/001.html
>
>An IBM Field Engineer told me that this one was built in 1939 based on the serial number.  It's a fairly late model since it punches 80-column cards; earlier versions punched fewer columns on cards.
>
>IBM called their tabulating machine repairmen Field Engineers, and required them to wear suits or sport coats and ties on their field calls.  They must have had tremendous dry cleaning bills since the equipment was full of oil and grease.
>
>I'm told that Forestry used this punch into the early 1960's at our research forest.


 
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Re: [Micronet] Friday photo: another keypunch

Marc Buchalter
In reply to this post by Al Stangenberger
I was amused by David's post last week.  But I think I may have him beat.  When I learned to program it was on Hollerith cards in Fortran IV that were complied on an IBM 360-67.   We had a 12 hour turn around.  Often one would discover that the program had stopped compiling at card 237 because one had omitted a comma.  Then another 12 hour wait to discover that you omitted a period in card 247.   Later we got a teletype terminal with paper tape.  We used to store those by wrapping them in a butterfly around the thumb and forefinger and we would have them all pinned up on a cork board.  We had no canned programs so we were always pulling down a tape to run an average or standard deviation or swapping tapes with each other.
Those were the days.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Caveat Emptor 

Marc Buchalter
Senior Campus Buyer
Procurement Services
University of California
1995 University Avenue, Suite 114
Berkeley, CA  94794-5600

Phone: (510) 642-2579



On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 11:36 AM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Friday Nostalgia Club,

Anyone pining for the IBM 7090 can still program and run their old sources on Windows or Linux: http://www.cozx.com/~dpitts/ibm7090.html.

greg

At 12:31 AM 5/3/2013, Al Stangenberger wrote:
>For those interested in old IBM equipment, here are photos of one of IBM's early products, the Model 001 Keypunch.  I keep this one in my office in Mulford for old times' sake.
>
>Herman Hollerith's company (The Tabulating Machine Co.) patented the 001 in 1901.  Tabulating Machine became IBM, and they kept this model number for the manual keypunch.
>
>http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/001.html
>
>An IBM Field Engineer told me that this one was built in 1939 based on the serial number.  It's a fairly late model since it punches 80-column cards; earlier versions punched fewer columns on cards.
>
>IBM called their tabulating machine repairmen Field Engineers, and required them to wear suits or sport coats and ties on their field calls.  They must have had tremendous dry cleaning bills since the equipment was full of oil and grease.
>
>I'm told that Forestry used this punch into the early 1960's at our research forest.



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IBM360-67ConfigConsoleAtUmich.jpg (76K) Download Attachment
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Re: [Micronet] Friday photo: another keypunch

Graham Patterson

Paper tape was surprisingly useful. Way back in buzz-static-buzz I used
to use an x-ray fluorescence system that output to a teletype (actually
an Olivetti) in local mode. This would print the data points, and also
generate a tape. At the end of each set we would put in a manual CRLF
sequence.

Once the analysis was done, we would cut off the paper tape, switch to
online mode and login to the shared system. Probably the Norsk Data NORD
rather than the Amdahl. Fire up an editor (probably ECCE), and play the
tape to load the data.

It worked, but the computer center gave us dire warnings that it 'was
not supported'. Some things never change.

We had rolls of paper tape containing raw data for many PhD.s. Even
after we lost the ability to read them!

Graham

On 5/3/13 2:44 PM, Marc BUCHALTER wrote:

> I was amused by David's post last week.  But I think I may have him
> beat.  When I learned to program it was on Hollerith cards in Fortran IV
> that were complied on an IBM 360-67.   We had a 12 hour turn around.
>  Often one would discover that the program had stopped compiling at card
> 237 because one had omitted a comma.  Then another 12 hour wait to
> discover that you omitted a period in card 247.   Later we got a
> teletype terminal with paper tape.  We used to store those by wrapping
> them in a butterfly around the thumb and forefinger and we would have
> them all pinned up on a cork board.  We had no canned programs so we
> were always pulling down a tape to run an average or standard deviation
> or swapping tapes with each other.
> Those were the days.
>
> /~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/
>
> /Caveat Emptor// /
>
>     Marc Buchalter
>     Senior Campus Buyer
>     Procurement Services
>     University of California
>     1995 University Avenue, Suite 114
>     Berkeley, CA  94794-5600
>
>     Phone: (510) 642-2579
>
>
>
> On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 11:36 AM, <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     Hi Friday Nostalgia Club,
>
>     Anyone pining for the IBM 7090 can still program and run their old
>     sources on Windows or Linux: http://www.cozx.com/~dpitts/ibm7090.html.
>
>     greg
>
>     At 12:31 AM 5/3/2013, Al Stangenberger wrote:
>     >For those interested in old IBM equipment, here are photos of one
>     of IBM's early products, the Model 001 Keypunch.  I keep this one in
>     my office in Mulford for old times' sake.
>     >
>     >Herman Hollerith's company (The Tabulating Machine Co.) patented
>     the 001 in 1901.  Tabulating Machine became IBM, and they kept this
>     model number for the manual keypunch.
>     >
>     >http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/001.html
>     >
>     >An IBM Field Engineer told me that this one was built in 1939 based
>     on the serial number.  It's a fairly late model since it punches
>     80-column cards; earlier versions punched fewer columns on cards.
>     >
>     >IBM called their tabulating machine repairmen Field Engineers, and
>     required them to wear suits or sport coats and ties on their field
>     calls.  They must have had tremendous dry cleaning bills since the
>     equipment was full of oil and grease.
>     >
>     >I'm told that Forestry used this punch into the early 1960's at our
>     research forest.
>
>
>
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>     server:
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>     To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or
>     unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming
>     meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
>     http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
>     Messages you send to this mailing list are public and
>     world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched
>     on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among
>     others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have
>     known you in the past.
>
>
>
>
>  
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> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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