[Micronet] Good Bye

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[Micronet] Good Bye

Yau-Man Chan-2
This is my last day. After 29 year at UC Berkeley, all of which was
spent at the College of Chemistry, I bid you all a fond farewell. As one
of the original 6 who started Micronet, forgive me if I feel nostalgic
and feel compelled to leave you this long rambling goodbye note.

It was June 1, 1984. My computer was the IBM-XT (4.77Mhz) - upgraded
later to an 6 Mhz IBM-AT. The hottest add-on was an over-clocking
clip-on circuit to boost it's performance to 8.33 Mhz! Wow.. I was a
speed junkie then! I built door controllers and card readers on
Commodore 64 to recharge for our College copy machine usage! I learn to
string up network wiring from Monica Mack who taught me how to do a
proper "vampire tap" on thick coax cables - a segment of which was still
in use in Latimer Hall in 2010! I was the go-to person for DOS 2.0.
WordStar ruled the day. (If you know what Cntrl-K-B and Cntrl-K-K do,
it's time you retire too!) My shop had the first EPROM chip programmer
set up just to duplicate the genuine IBM BIOS chip to be used in cheap
Taiwan clones to make them 100% IBM compatible - the benchmark test of
which was to be able to run the IBM branded version of Lotus 1-2-3! My
first network server was Novell Netware 2.11. ..the 300Meg Maxtor hard
disk for the server cost $1,995, and network card of choice was
Ungerman-Bass and 3Com - oh how time flies… In later years, I was able
to help shape IS&T by training IT professionals in Chemistry before
unloading them to IS&T. I stole Mike Sinatra from Pol. Sci as a PA-II,
gave him the opportunity to upgrade himself from a Unix hack to a Zen
Master of network protocols and send him off to IS&T as a PA-IV where he
did great and wonderful things for the Campus network. I stole John Ives
from English, again as a PA-II, then sent him off to IS&T as a PA-IV
network security guru. I am proud of that legacy. Now my fellow
departmental IT directors will finally understand why I don't have a
contentious relationship with IS&T and am one of the few who would wave
to IS&T employees with all five fingers when we run into each other on
campus!

I have served on many committees that generated fancy reports which went
nowhere - Administration Computing Funding, Network Funding Model, and
Time Tracking and Reporting.. just to name a few.

In the 29 years in supervisory position, I only had one formal grievance
filed against me - it was by a new hire programmer dismissed during his
probationary period but claimed that I did not make necessary
accommodation for his disability - which according to his claim, he's a
"slow learner!" Failure of career counseling?

I learned how big this campus really is when I recently found out that
many on Micronet may know my name but have never seen me. Well, if you
are one of them, walk to the locker rooms of the RSF and I'm the guy
with the table-tennis racket on the mural. That's my greatest
achievement on this campus - to be featured on a mural in front of the
locker room! My CBS Survivor Fiji season is now on DVD which you can get
from Amazon but since I don't get any residues, I encourage you to not
buy it but instead try to download it from MegaLoad!

I want to spare myself the chaos of repeating myself by preemptively
answering a few FAQ about my life in retirement. Yes, I'll do the usual,
traveling, reading etc. My challenge to myself is to try to finally
learn to use all the 27 blending modes in Photoshop layers and
understand why the hell are there 27 blending modes! I will travel but
mostly to remote parts of Asia, where I can commune with the Orang-Utans
and hang out with people who measure time by seasons and not
nano-seconds! I was once a very serious "wet" darkroom photographer so
I'll go back to take up photography seriously again - this time digital.
My goal is to have a photo credit in an upcoming issue of Sports
Illustrated Swim Suite Edition. (If you are considering modeling for me,
take a number and stand in line - it's amazing when I show up a CBS's
Hollywood open-bar parties with a real camera, I have no shortage of
wanna-be starlets wanting to pose for me!) Speaking of modeling, to
augment my retirement income to pay for my expensive hobbies, I've just
been signed by a baby-boomer modeling agency to do "life-style" ads
targeted at older Asians. So, don't be surprise if you see me in ads in
the AARP magazine or hawking Viagra on late night infomercials. (My
contract will stipulate a disclaimer crawl at the bottom of the screen
that the actor portraying the patient do not need the medication himself!)

The world of IT, both on an off Campus has changed a lot over the last
29 years and while mentally exhausting and intellectually challenging, I
am glad that I was a part of it. To my fellow IT professionals, thank
you all very much for your help and support all these years. I wish your
all the best as you try to adapt to and navigate your way through the
latest paradigm shift in IT support for Campus. Yes, I understand the
stress and uncertainty but I'm confident that you'll all learn to deal
with it - Shift Happens!

I take with me nothing but fond memories of my days spent here at UC
Berkeley and of all the friends and colleagues I have had the pleasure
to work and interact with. So, let me end this missive with a sappy
cliche quote from the last sentence of F. Scott Fitzerald's The Great
Gatsby: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back
ceaselessly into the past."

Yau-Man Chan
College of Chemistry Head Geek Emeritus.

 
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Re: [Micronet] Good Bye

Donna L Lee
Well said.  You brought many smiles and laughs when I read this. Gosh. I,
too, remember how it was like those old days!  Enjoy your next 29 year
career!


Donna L Lee
Facilities Services Information Technology (FSIT)
UC, Berkeley
2000 Carleton Street, Room 240
Berkeley, CA 94720-1384
Phone:  (510) 642-6337
[hidden email]
Website:  www.facilities.berkeley.edu


-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Yau-Man
Chan
Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2013 11:44 AM
To: List Micronet
Subject: [Micronet] Good Bye

This is my last day. After 29 year at UC Berkeley, all of which was spent
at the College of Chemistry, I bid you all a fond farewell. As one of the
original 6 who started Micronet, forgive me if I feel nostalgic and feel
compelled to leave you this long rambling goodbye note.

It was June 1, 1984. My computer was the IBM-XT (4.77Mhz) - upgraded later
to an 6 Mhz IBM-AT. The hottest add-on was an over-clocking clip-on
circuit to boost it's performance to 8.33 Mhz! Wow.. I was a speed junkie
then! I built door controllers and card readers on Commodore 64 to
recharge for our College copy machine usage! I learn to string up network
wiring from Monica Mack who taught me how to do a proper "vampire tap" on
thick coax cables - a segment of which was still in use in Latimer Hall in
2010! I was the go-to person for DOS 2.0.
WordStar ruled the day. (If you know what Cntrl-K-B and Cntrl-K-K do, it's
time you retire too!) My shop had the first EPROM chip programmer set up
just to duplicate the genuine IBM BIOS chip to be used in cheap Taiwan
clones to make them 100% IBM compatible - the benchmark test of which was
to be able to run the IBM branded version of Lotus 1-2-3! My first network
server was Novell Netware 2.11. ..the 300Meg Maxtor hard disk for the
server cost $1,995, and network card of choice was Ungerman-Bass and 3Com
- oh how time flies… In later years, I was able to help shape IS&T by
training IT professionals in Chemistry before unloading them to IS&T. I
stole Mike Sinatra from Pol. Sci as a PA-II, gave him the opportunity to
upgrade himself from a Unix hack to a Zen Master of network protocols and
send him off to IS&T as a PA-IV where he did great and wonderful things
for the Campus network. I stole John Ives from English, again as a PA-II,
then sent him off to IS&T as a PA-IV network security guru. I am proud of
that legacy. Now my fellow departmental IT directors will finally
understand why I don't have a contentious relationship with IS&T and am
one of the few who would wave to IS&T employees with all five fingers when
we run into each other on campus!

I have served on many committees that generated fancy reports which went
nowhere - Administration Computing Funding, Network Funding Model, and
Time Tracking and Reporting.. just to name a few.

In the 29 years in supervisory position, I only had one formal grievance
filed against me - it was by a new hire programmer dismissed during his
probationary period but claimed that I did not make necessary
accommodation for his disability - which according to his claim, he's a
"slow learner!" Failure of career counseling?

I learned how big this campus really is when I recently found out that
many on Micronet may know my name but have never seen me. Well, if you are
one of them, walk to the locker rooms of the RSF and I'm the guy with the
table-tennis racket on the mural. That's my greatest achievement on this
campus - to be featured on a mural in front of the locker room! My CBS
Survivor Fiji season is now on DVD which you can get from Amazon but since
I don't get any residues, I encourage you to not buy it but instead try to
download it from MegaLoad!

I want to spare myself the chaos of repeating myself by preemptively
answering a few FAQ about my life in retirement. Yes, I'll do the usual,
traveling, reading etc. My challenge to myself is to try to finally learn
to use all the 27 blending modes in Photoshop layers and understand why
the hell are there 27 blending modes! I will travel but mostly to remote
parts of Asia, where I can commune with the Orang-Utans and hang out with
people who measure time by seasons and not nano-seconds! I was once a very
serious "wet" darkroom photographer so I'll go back to take up photography
seriously again - this time digital.
My goal is to have a photo credit in an upcoming issue of Sports
Illustrated Swim Suite Edition. (If you are considering modeling for me,
take a number and stand in line - it's amazing when I show up a CBS's
Hollywood open-bar parties with a real camera, I have no shortage of
wanna-be starlets wanting to pose for me!) Speaking of modeling, to
augment my retirement income to pay for my expensive hobbies, I've just
been signed by a baby-boomer modeling agency to do "life-style" ads
targeted at older Asians. So, don't be surprise if you see me in ads in
the AARP magazine or hawking Viagra on late night infomercials. (My
contract will stipulate a disclaimer crawl at the bottom of the screen
that the actor portraying the patient do not need the medication himself!)

The world of IT, both on an off Campus has changed a lot over the last
29 years and while mentally exhausting and intellectually challenging, I
am glad that I was a part of it. To my fellow IT professionals, thank you
all very much for your help and support all these years. I wish your all
the best as you try to adapt to and navigate your way through the latest
paradigm shift in IT support for Campus. Yes, I understand the stress and
uncertainty but I'm confident that you'll all learn to deal with it -
Shift Happens!

I take with me nothing but fond memories of my days spent here at UC
Berkeley and of all the friends and colleagues I have had the pleasure to
work and interact with. So, let me end this missive with a sappy cliche
quote from the last sentence of F. Scott Fitzerald's The Great
Gatsby: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly
into the past."

Yau-Man Chan
College of Chemistry Head Geek Emeritus.


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To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 
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The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
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Re: [Micronet] Good Bye

Graham Patterson
In reply to this post by Yau-Man Chan-2
 From 'how to we make this?' to 'how do we use this?' pretty much sums
up the last three decades of computing.

It does not sound like you will be lacking for interesting things to do!

Graham

On 6/27/2013 11:43 AM, Yau-Man Chan wrote:

> This is my last day. After 29 year at UC Berkeley, all of which was
> spent at the College of Chemistry, I bid you all a fond farewell. As one
> of the original 6 who started Micronet, forgive me if I feel nostalgic
> and feel compelled to leave you this long rambling goodbye note.
>
> It was June 1, 1984. My computer was the IBM-XT (4.77Mhz) - upgraded
> later to an 6 Mhz IBM-AT. The hottest add-on was an over-clocking
> clip-on circuit to boost it's performance to 8.33 Mhz! Wow.. I was a
> speed junkie then! I built door controllers and card readers on
> Commodore 64 to recharge for our College copy machine usage! I learn to
> string up network wiring from Monica Mack who taught me how to do a
> proper "vampire tap" on thick coax cables - a segment of which was still
> in use in Latimer Hall in 2010! I was the go-to person for DOS 2.0.
> WordStar ruled the day. (If you know what Cntrl-K-B and Cntrl-K-K do,
> it's time you retire too!) My shop had the first EPROM chip programmer
> set up just to duplicate the genuine IBM BIOS chip to be used in cheap
> Taiwan clones to make them 100% IBM compatible - the benchmark test of
> which was to be able to run the IBM branded version of Lotus 1-2-3! My
> first network server was Novell Netware 2.11. ..the 300Meg Maxtor hard
> disk for the server cost $1,995, and network card of choice was
> Ungerman-Bass and 3Com - oh how time flies… In later years, I was able
> to help shape IS&T by training IT professionals in Chemistry before
> unloading them to IS&T. I stole Mike Sinatra from Pol. Sci as a PA-II,
> gave him the opportunity to upgrade himself from a Unix hack to a Zen
> Master of network protocols and send him off to IS&T as a PA-IV where he
> did great and wonderful things for the Campus network. I stole John Ives
> from English, again as a PA-II, then sent him off to IS&T as a PA-IV
> network security guru. I am proud of that legacy. Now my fellow
> departmental IT directors will finally understand why I don't have a
> contentious relationship with IS&T and am one of the few who would wave
> to IS&T employees with all five fingers when we run into each other on
> campus!
>
> I have served on many committees that generated fancy reports which went
> nowhere - Administration Computing Funding, Network Funding Model, and
> Time Tracking and Reporting.. just to name a few.
>
> In the 29 years in supervisory position, I only had one formal grievance
> filed against me - it was by a new hire programmer dismissed during his
> probationary period but claimed that I did not make necessary
> accommodation for his disability - which according to his claim, he's a
> "slow learner!" Failure of career counseling?
>
> I learned how big this campus really is when I recently found out that
> many on Micronet may know my name but have never seen me. Well, if you
> are one of them, walk to the locker rooms of the RSF and I'm the guy
> with the table-tennis racket on the mural. That's my greatest
> achievement on this campus - to be featured on a mural in front of the
> locker room! My CBS Survivor Fiji season is now on DVD which you can get
> from Amazon but since I don't get any residues, I encourage you to not
> buy it but instead try to download it from MegaLoad!
>
> I want to spare myself the chaos of repeating myself by preemptively
> answering a few FAQ about my life in retirement. Yes, I'll do the usual,
> traveling, reading etc. My challenge to myself is to try to finally
> learn to use all the 27 blending modes in Photoshop layers and
> understand why the hell are there 27 blending modes! I will travel but
> mostly to remote parts of Asia, where I can commune with the Orang-Utans
> and hang out with people who measure time by seasons and not
> nano-seconds! I was once a very serious "wet" darkroom photographer so
> I'll go back to take up photography seriously again - this time digital.
> My goal is to have a photo credit in an upcoming issue of Sports
> Illustrated Swim Suite Edition. (If you are considering modeling for me,
> take a number and stand in line - it's amazing when I show up a CBS's
> Hollywood open-bar parties with a real camera, I have no shortage of
> wanna-be starlets wanting to pose for me!) Speaking of modeling, to
> augment my retirement income to pay for my expensive hobbies, I've just
> been signed by a baby-boomer modeling agency to do "life-style" ads
> targeted at older Asians. So, don't be surprise if you see me in ads in
> the AARP magazine or hawking Viagra on late night infomercials. (My
> contract will stipulate a disclaimer crawl at the bottom of the screen
> that the actor portraying the patient do not need the medication himself!)
>
> The world of IT, both on an off Campus has changed a lot over the last
> 29 years and while mentally exhausting and intellectually challenging, I
> am glad that I was a part of it. To my fellow IT professionals, thank
> you all very much for your help and support all these years. I wish your
> all the best as you try to adapt to and navigate your way through the
> latest paradigm shift in IT support for Campus. Yes, I understand the
> stress and uncertainty but I'm confident that you'll all learn to deal
> with it - Shift Happens!
>
> I take with me nothing but fond memories of my days spent here at UC
> Berkeley and of all the friends and colleagues I have had the pleasure
> to work and interact with. So, let me end this missive with a sappy
> cliche quote from the last sentence of F. Scott Fitzerald's The Great
> Gatsby: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back
> ceaselessly into the past."
>
> Yau-Man Chan
> College of Chemistry Head Geek Emeritus.
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>

--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon,
the mathematical puzzles, and the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
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Re: [Micronet] Good Bye

Kellsie Munoz
In reply to this post by Yau-Man Chan-2
Thank you  Yau-Man , on behalf of all of IS&T for giving us Michael & John. And for all of your other wonderful  contributions to this campus!

Best Wishes, 

Kellsie Mũnoz 
Hostmistress
Information Services & Technology
University of California Berkeley
(510) 643-1987  [hidden email] 

On Jun 27, 2013, at 11:43 AM, Yau-Man Chan wrote:

This is my last day. After 29 year at UC Berkeley, all of which was
spent at the College of Chemistry, I bid you all a fond farewell. As one
of the original 6 who started Micronet, forgive me if I feel nostalgic
and feel compelled to leave you this long rambling goodbye note.

It was June 1, 1984. My computer was the IBM-XT (4.77Mhz) - upgraded
later to an 6 Mhz IBM-AT. The hottest add-on was an over-clocking
clip-on circuit to boost it's performance to 8.33 Mhz! Wow.. I was a
speed junkie then! I built door controllers and card readers on
Commodore 64 to recharge for our College copy machine usage! I learn to
string up network wiring from Monica Mack who taught me how to do a
proper "vampire tap" on thick coax cables - a segment of which was still
in use in Latimer Hall in 2010! I was the go-to person for DOS 2.0.
WordStar ruled the day. (If you know what Cntrl-K-B and Cntrl-K-K do,
it's time you retire too!) My shop had the first EPROM chip programmer
set up just to duplicate the genuine IBM BIOS chip to be used in cheap
Taiwan clones to make them 100% IBM compatible - the benchmark test of
which was to be able to run the IBM branded version of Lotus 1-2-3! My
first network server was Novell Netware 2.11. ..the 300Meg Maxtor hard
disk for the server cost $1,995, and network card of choice was
Ungerman-Bass and 3Com - oh how time flies… In later years, I was able
to help shape IS&T by training IT professionals in Chemistry before
unloading them to IS&T. I stole Mike Sinatra from Pol. Sci as a PA-II,
gave him the opportunity to upgrade himself from a Unix hack to a Zen
Master of network protocols and send him off to IS&T as a PA-IV where he
did great and wonderful things for the Campus network. I stole John Ives
from English, again as a PA-II, then sent him off to IS&T as a PA-IV
network security guru. I am proud of that legacy. Now my fellow
departmental IT directors will finally understand why I don't have a
contentious relationship with IS&T and am one of the few who would wave
to IS&T employees with all five fingers when we run into each other on
campus!

I have served on many committees that generated fancy reports which went
nowhere - Administration Computing Funding, Network Funding Model, and
Time Tracking and Reporting.. just to name a few.

In the 29 years in supervisory position, I only had one formal grievance
filed against me - it was by a new hire programmer dismissed during his
probationary period but claimed that I did not make necessary
accommodation for his disability - which according to his claim, he's a
"slow learner!" Failure of career counseling?

I learned how big this campus really is when I recently found out that
many on Micronet may know my name but have never seen me. Well, if you
are one of them, walk to the locker rooms of the RSF and I'm the guy
with the table-tennis racket on the mural. That's my greatest
achievement on this campus - to be featured on a mural in front of the
locker room! My CBS Survivor Fiji season is now on DVD which you can get
from Amazon but since I don't get any residues, I encourage you to not
buy it but instead try to download it from MegaLoad!

I want to spare myself the chaos of repeating myself by preemptively
answering a few FAQ about my life in retirement. Yes, I'll do the usual,
traveling, reading etc. My challenge to myself is to try to finally
learn to use all the 27 blending modes in Photoshop layers and
understand why the hell are there 27 blending modes! I will travel but
mostly to remote parts of Asia, where I can commune with the Orang-Utans
and hang out with people who measure time by seasons and not
nano-seconds! I was once a very serious "wet" darkroom photographer so
I'll go back to take up photography seriously again - this time digital.
My goal is to have a photo credit in an upcoming issue of Sports
Illustrated Swim Suite Edition. (If you are considering modeling for me,
take a number and stand in line - it's amazing when I show up a CBS's
Hollywood open-bar parties with a real camera, I have no shortage of
wanna-be starlets wanting to pose for me!) Speaking of modeling, to
augment my retirement income to pay for my expensive hobbies, I've just
been signed by a baby-boomer modeling agency to do "life-style" ads
targeted at older Asians. So, don't be surprise if you see me in ads in
the AARP magazine or hawking Viagra on late night infomercials. (My
contract will stipulate a disclaimer crawl at the bottom of the screen
that the actor portraying the patient do not need the medication himself!)

The world of IT, both on an off Campus has changed a lot over the last
29 years and while mentally exhausting and intellectually challenging, I
am glad that I was a part of it. To my fellow IT professionals, thank
you all very much for your help and support all these years. I wish your
all the best as you try to adapt to and navigate your way through the
latest paradigm shift in IT support for Campus. Yes, I understand the
stress and uncertainty but I'm confident that you'll all learn to deal
with it - Shift Happens!

I take with me nothing but fond memories of my days spent here at UC
Berkeley and of all the friends and colleagues I have had the pleasure
to work and interact with. So, let me end this missive with a sappy
cliche quote from the last sentence of F. Scott Fitzerald's The Great
Gatsby: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back
ceaselessly into the past."

Yau-Man Chan
College of Chemistry Head Geek Emeritus.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
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Re: [Micronet] Good Bye

Beth Muramoto
In reply to this post by Yau-Man Chan-2
Yau-Man,

Well said and I couldn't agree more.

I think we could all learn to "measure time by seasons and not
nano-seconds" in this harried and stressful world.

I wish you a well lived and well deserved retirement. I have enjoyed the meetings and groups that I have been a part of with you.

Live long and Prosper!

Beth


On Thu, Jun 27, 2013 at 11:43 AM, Yau-Man Chan <[hidden email]> wrote:
This is my last day. After 29 year at UC Berkeley, all of which was
spent at the College of Chemistry, I bid you all a fond farewell. As one
of the original 6 who started Micronet, forgive me if I feel nostalgic
and feel compelled to leave you this long rambling goodbye note.

It was June 1, 1984. My computer was the IBM-XT (4.77Mhz) - upgraded
later to an 6 Mhz IBM-AT. The hottest add-on was an over-clocking
clip-on circuit to boost it's performance to 8.33 Mhz! Wow.. I was a
speed junkie then! I built door controllers and card readers on
Commodore 64 to recharge for our College copy machine usage! I learn to
string up network wiring from Monica Mack who taught me how to do a
proper "vampire tap" on thick coax cables - a segment of which was still
in use in Latimer Hall in 2010! I was the go-to person for DOS 2.0.
WordStar ruled the day. (If you know what Cntrl-K-B and Cntrl-K-K do,
it's time you retire too!) My shop had the first EPROM chip programmer
set up just to duplicate the genuine IBM BIOS chip to be used in cheap
Taiwan clones to make them 100% IBM compatible - the benchmark test of
which was to be able to run the IBM branded version of Lotus 1-2-3! My
first network server was Novell Netware 2.11. ..the 300Meg Maxtor hard
disk for the server cost $1,995, and network card of choice was
Ungerman-Bass and 3Com - oh how time flies… In later years, I was able
to help shape IS&T by training IT professionals in Chemistry before
unloading them to IS&T. I stole Mike Sinatra from Pol. Sci as a PA-II,
gave him the opportunity to upgrade himself from a Unix hack to a Zen
Master of network protocols and send him off to IS&T as a PA-IV where he
did great and wonderful things for the Campus network. I stole John Ives
from English, again as a PA-II, then sent him off to IS&T as a PA-IV
network security guru. I am proud of that legacy. Now my fellow
departmental IT directors will finally understand why I don't have a
contentious relationship with IS&T and am one of the few who would wave
to IS&T employees with all five fingers when we run into each other on
campus!

I have served on many committees that generated fancy reports which went
nowhere - Administration Computing Funding, Network Funding Model, and
Time Tracking and Reporting.. just to name a few.

In the 29 years in supervisory position, I only had one formal grievance
filed against me - it was by a new hire programmer dismissed during his
probationary period but claimed that I did not make necessary
accommodation for his disability - which according to his claim, he's a
"slow learner!" Failure of career counseling?

I learned how big this campus really is when I recently found out that
many on Micronet may know my name but have never seen me. Well, if you
are one of them, walk to the locker rooms of the RSF and I'm the guy
with the table-tennis racket on the mural. That's my greatest
achievement on this campus - to be featured on a mural in front of the
locker room! My CBS Survivor Fiji season is now on DVD which you can get
from Amazon but since I don't get any residues, I encourage you to not
buy it but instead try to download it from MegaLoad!

I want to spare myself the chaos of repeating myself by preemptively
answering a few FAQ about my life in retirement. Yes, I'll do the usual,
traveling, reading etc. My challenge to myself is to try to finally
learn to use all the 27 blending modes in Photoshop layers and
understand why the hell are there 27 blending modes! I will travel but
mostly to remote parts of Asia, where I can commune with the Orang-Utans
and hang out with people who measure time by seasons and not
nano-seconds! I was once a very serious "wet" darkroom photographer so
I'll go back to take up photography seriously again - this time digital.
My goal is to have a photo credit in an upcoming issue of Sports
Illustrated Swim Suite Edition. (If you are considering modeling for me,
take a number and stand in line - it's amazing when I show up a CBS's
Hollywood open-bar parties with a real camera, I have no shortage of
wanna-be starlets wanting to pose for me!) Speaking of modeling, to
augment my retirement income to pay for my expensive hobbies, I've just
been signed by a baby-boomer modeling agency to do "life-style" ads
targeted at older Asians. So, don't be surprise if you see me in ads in
the AARP magazine or hawking Viagra on late night infomercials. (My
contract will stipulate a disclaimer crawl at the bottom of the screen
that the actor portraying the patient do not need the medication himself!)

The world of IT, both on an off Campus has changed a lot over the last
29 years and while mentally exhausting and intellectually challenging, I
am glad that I was a part of it. To my fellow IT professionals, thank
you all very much for your help and support all these years. I wish your
all the best as you try to adapt to and navigate your way through the
latest paradigm shift in IT support for Campus. Yes, I understand the
stress and uncertainty but I'm confident that you'll all learn to deal
with it - Shift Happens!

I take with me nothing but fond memories of my days spent here at UC
Berkeley and of all the friends and colleagues I have had the pleasure
to work and interact with. So, let me end this missive with a sappy
cliche quote from the last sentence of F. Scott Fitzerald's The Great
Gatsby: "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back
ceaselessly into the past."

Yau-Man Chan
College of Chemistry Head Geek Emeritus.


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--
***********************************************
Beth Muramoto
Computer Resource Specialist
Graduate School of Education
University of California, Berkeley
1650 Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
Phone:  (510) 643-0203 
Fax:  (510) 643-6239

“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities have crept in – forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”

                            -Emerson

“Kind words do not cost much yet they accomplish much.” 

                            -Blaise Pascal

You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things." 

-Stephen Covey

***********************************************


 
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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.