[Micronet] Micronet takes a trip down memory lane

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[Micronet] Micronet takes a trip down memory lane

David Scronce
It's nice to see Micronet waxing nostalgic over 8" floppies.

In junior high, I learned to use a keypunch machine so I'd have "marketable skills." 

In one of my first jobs, around 1980, I made *paper* tapes full of holes that represented naems and addresses and carried them from the insurance company I worked for near Wall Street to the lower Manhattan Telex office. The paper tapes were always tearing so I'd have to tape them together and run them through the Telex again to make sure they still worked.  That's how a major insurance carrier did a "mail merge" in those days.

Have I told you about the word processor I used that stored documents on cassette tapes? This was at the enormous New York City Law Department.


David Scronce
COrWE Senior Organizational Consultant &
  Productivity Suite Change Manager
510-664-4526



 
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Re: [Micronet] Micronet takes a trip down memory lane

Graham Patterson

I used to work with a computer that used front panel switches to program
it. At least the memory was non-volatile - might even have been core.
That used an optical paper tape reader which needed opaque tape. The
ordinary white stuff for mechanical tape punches wouldn't work.

The computer was the analysis side of an energy dispersive x-ray system
on an electron microscope.

Graham

On 4/26/13 3:57 PM, David Scronce wrote:

> It's nice to see Micronet waxing nostalgic over 8" floppies.
>
> In junior high, I learned to use a keypunch machine so I'd have
> "marketable skills."
>
> In one of my first jobs, around 1980, I made *paper* tapes full of holes
> that represented naems and addresses and carried them from the insurance
> company I worked for near Wall Street to the lower Manhattan Telex
> office. The paper tapes were always tearing so I'd have to tape them
> together and run them through the Telex again to make sure they still
> worked.  That's how a major insurance carrier did a "mail merge" in
> those days.
>
> Have I told you about the word processor I used that stored documents on
> cassette tapes? This was at the enormous New York City Law Department.
>
>
> *David Scronce*
> COrWE Senior Organizational Consultant &
>   Productivity Suite Change Manager
> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
> 510-664-4526
> http://bconnected.berkeley.edu/
> http://bconnected-project.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>  
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.