[Micronet] More Friday nostalgia

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[Micronet] More Friday nostalgia

Graham Patterson
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10951040


Graham

--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the Tyranosaurus, the Mastodon, the mathematical puzzles, and
the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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[Micronet] More Friday nostalgia

David Johnson-2
>>>>> "Graham" == Graham Patterson <[hidden email]> writes:

    Graham> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10951040 Graham

Wow - quite a coincidence - Ousedale (where the kids in the video were
from) was where I went to high school back before I became
Bezerkeley-ized.  I was actually the first student at Ousedale to use
a school computer - a Sinclair ZX80 (much like a Timex Sinclair 1000).
After that we got an RM380Z
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_Machines_380Z - I doubt many of
these made it to this side of the pond).  We also had most of a Nascom
2, but it turned out you needed all of it for it to do anything
useful.

I can tell you when thing, though - we were a hard core Z80 school -
none of that BBC Micro (or, even worse, Commodore PET) 6502 rubbish
when I was around!  And using hardware sound for bombs - pah - that's
not how the Ousedale kids did in the old days.  If you wanted to make
noises you did it the proper way, by twiddling a single I/O port bit
using assembler, not by using BASIC to get some fancy-pants sound chip
to do all the work for you...

David.
--
David Johnson, [hidden email], (510) 666-2983
System Manager, International Computer Science Institute

PS I can't actually claim to be the first student to program at
Ousedale School - there were some students before me who did a
computer class by mailing punch cards to a mainframe located at the
other end of the county and getting printouts back a week later...

    Graham> -- Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator Lawrence Hall
    Graham> of Science, UC Berkeley 510-643-2222 "...past the
    Graham> Tyranosaurus, the Mastodon, the mathematical puzzles, and
    Graham> the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
    Graham> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Graham> The following was automatically added to this message by
    Graham> the list server:

    Graham> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe
    Graham> to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find
    Graham> out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web
    Graham> site:

    Graham> http://micronet.berkeley.edu

    Graham> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and
    Graham> world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and
    Graham> searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can
    Graham> be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
    Graham> employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
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