[Micronet] New Apple iMacs available

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[Micronet] New Apple iMacs available

Petersen, Joanne

Dear Colleagues,

 

Effective immediately, there will be a change in the Apple iMac models offered through the Joint Administrative Computing Standards program to reflect the introduction of new iMacs by Apple.

 

Apple offered the new iMacs to UC on November 30th but only with the standard educational discount and without Apple Care included.  Apple will transition the standard bundles it offers to UCSF and UC Berkeley for these new iMacs to reflect the higher UC discount, but this will take 4 – 5 days.  The Apple iMacs with educational discount will continue to be offered on our punch-out until UC discounts and bundles are approved by Apple and made available to us.  If you order at the standard educational discount price, you will not get a refund when the new pricing is made available. 

 

At UCSF, the Apple quick-order iMac configurations may be temporarily unavailable during the transition. Quick-order is available only for the base configurations. Upgrade requests must be processed through the Apple Store link in BearBuy.  We will notify you when the UC discounts have been restored.

 

The new configurations are:

 

iMac 21.5”:  

  • 2.9GHz Quad-core Intel Core i5
  • 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM (Upgradeable to 16GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM)*
  • 1TB hard drive, 5400 RPM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M, 512MB GDDR5 memory
  • LED backlit display, 1920 x 1080 resolution
  • Wireless keyboard (English) & Magic mouse
  • 3 year AppleCare Protection Plan                                           

iMac 27":

  • 3.2GHz Quad-core Intel Core i5
  • 8GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM (Upgradeable to 16GB or 32GB 1600MHz DDR3 SDRAM)*
  • 1TB hard drive, 7200 RPM
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 675M, 1GB GDDR5 memory
  • LED backlit display, 2560 x 1440 resolution
  • Wireless keyboard (English) & Magic mouse
  • 3 year AppleCare Protection Plan

*Upgrades to Apple equipment must be processed through the Apple Store link in BearBuy.

 

Apple also has a 13” MacBook Pro with Retina Display available, and this will also be added to the UC Apple punch-outs.  Here is the configuration for this model:

 

  • 2.5 GHz – dual core Intel Core i5
  • 256 GB flash storage
  • Apple Backlit Keyboard - English (included)
  • 3-year Warranty

 

Thank you for your participation in the Joint Administrative Computing Standards program; there are real benefits to UC in purchasing JACS computers.  If you have questions or feedback regarding the Apple ordering process, please contact the BearBuy Help Desk at [hidden email] or call 415-514-4100, Option 2.

 

Best Regards,

     Joanne Hiratsuka Petersen

       IT Hardware Commodity Manager, Campus Procurement & Contracting

       University of California, San Francisco |1855 Folsom #304 | San Francisco, CA 94143-0910

( 415-514-2872 | * [hidden email] | [hidden email]

 


 
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[Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Jon Johnsen
http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/gift-guide-please-any-geek-25-years-ago?source=NWWNLE_nlt_buzzblog_2012-12-06
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357



 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Richard DeShong-2
Thanks for that Jon.  I find it interesting how little things have changed.

btw;  My friend went to a factory in Oakland to pickup a Morrow Designs computer - serial # 7.  Hot off the press, so to speak.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 8:00 AM, Jon Johnsen <[hidden email]> wrote:
http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/gift-guide-please-any-geek-25-years-ago?source=NWWNLE_nlt_buzzblog_2012-12-06
Jon Johnsen
Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357




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--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu


 
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gts
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

gts
Gary Kildall in the video was the true founder of personal computing. He invented CP/M in 1976 with a layered, open architecture that made possible the third-party software and hardware revolution.

The personal computer revolution was first supported by small businesses and individuals, starting in 1976, running CP/M on commercial systems such as IMSAI (San Leandro, Ca), Godbout/Compupro (Oakland, Ca), and Thinker Toys (Berkeley, Ca; later Morrow Designs), etc.

Universities and Corporations were not on the leading edge. The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).

Gary was killed in 1994, so the victors, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, got to write the history.

https://bspace.berkeley.edu/access/content/user/4307/Computing/CPM/GaryKildall.html

greg

At 12:38 PM 12/6/2012, Richard DESHONG wrote:
Thanks for that Jon.  I find it interesting how little things have changed.

btw;  My friend went to a factory in Oakland to pickup a Morrow Designs computer - serial # 7.  Hot off the press, so to speak.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 8:00 AM, Jon Johnsen <[hidden email]> wrote:
http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/gift-guide-please-any-geek-25-years-ago?source=NWWNLE_nlt_buzzblog_2012-12-06

Jon Johnsen

Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357

 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
Ahh yes, CompuPro, that was the company.  And CP/M and MP/M - names I haven't heard in a long time.  I use to build CompuPro boxes, installing S100 cards, testing/formatting the drives (which took dozens of hours), and installed accounting software.  Then went out to businesses and ran serial cabling and connecting terminals.  Fun stuff.

I also know about Kildall (although names always escape me) - and about where Gates "got/stole" the code for his OS.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 1:21 PM, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Gary Kildall in the video was the true founder of personal computing. He invented CP/M in 1976 with a layered, open architecture that made possible the third-party software and hardware revolution.

The personal computer revolution was first supported by small businesses and individuals, starting in 1976, running CP/M on commercial systems such as IMSAI (San Leandro, Ca), Godbout/Compupro (Oakland, Ca), and Thinker Toys (Berkeley, Ca; later Morrow Designs), etc.

Universities and Corporations were not on the leading edge. The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).

Gary was killed in 1994, so the victors, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, got to write the history.

https://bspace.berkeley.edu/access/content/user/4307/Computing/CPM/GaryKildall.html

greg


At 12:38 PM 12/6/2012, Richard DESHONG wrote:
Thanks for that Jon.  I find it interesting how little things have changed.

btw;  My friend went to a factory in Oakland to pickup a Morrow Designs computer - serial # 7.  Hot off the press, so to speak.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 8:00 AM, Jon Johnsen <[hidden email]> wrote:
http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/gift-guide-please-any-geek-25-years-ago?source=NWWNLE_nlt_buzzblog_2012-12-06

Jon Johnsen

Information Systems Office
433 University Hall
School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
510 643-4357



--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu


 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Ryan Lovett
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
Do you mean the CSRG?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Systems_Research_Group

There had been a hallway sign in Evans misdirecting people to that defunct
group's non-existent office until a couple of years ago when a surge
department "corrected" the information.

Ryan

On Thu, Dec 06, 2012 at 01:21:49PM -0800, [hidden email] wrote:
> The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users
> Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead
> of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).

 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Richard DeShong-2
No, I don't think it was related to CSRG.  You might be thinking about Apple.  My understanding is that Gates used a "variant" of CP/M to create his first OS.  I wish I could remember people names (I'm more of an idea person), but the person that wrote most of the changes won a nice settlement from Microsoft in the early days.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 3:23 PM, Ryan Lovett <[hidden email]> wrote:
Do you mean the CSRG?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Systems_Research_Group

There had been a hallway sign in Evans misdirecting people to that defunct
group's non-existent office until a couple of years ago when a surge
department "corrected" the information.

Ryan

On Thu, Dec 06, 2012 at 01:21:49PM -0800, [hidden email] wrote:
> The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users
> Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead
> of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).



--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu


 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Seth Novogrodsky

Regarding Bill Gates and CP/M, IBM approached Microsoft about obtaining an OS for their PC because Digital Research wasn’t able to deliver on their schedule. Microsoft didn’t have an OS so they licensed an OS from  Seattle Computer Products. The OS that was essentially a clone of CP/M that ran on the 8088 processor.  (CP/M ran on the 8080 and Z80, not the newer 8086/8088. CP/M-86 came later.) There was no settlement from Microsoft for “stealing CP/M,” although there was an intellectual property dispute. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/86-DOS.

 

Seth

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard DESHONG
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2012 3:42 PM
To: Ryan Lovett
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

 

No, I don't think it was related to CSRG.  You might be thinking about Apple.  My understanding is that Gates used a "variant" of CP/M to create his first OS.  I wish I could remember people names (I'm more of an idea person), but the person that wrote most of the changes won a nice settlement from Microsoft in the early days.

 

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 3:23 PM, Ryan Lovett <[hidden email]> wrote:

Do you mean the CSRG?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Systems_Research_Group

There had been a hallway sign in Evans misdirecting people to that defunct
group's non-existent office until a couple of years ago when a surge
department "corrected" the information.

Ryan


On Thu, Dec 06, 2012 at 01:21:49PM -0800, [hidden email] wrote:
> The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users
> Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead
> of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).



 

--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu


 
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

Richard DeShong-2
Yes, I was definitely thinking of the SCP settlement (the million dollar settlement rings a bell as I try to remember the conversation), not the DR intellectual rights issue.

I've got a cousin that knows a good number of those early OS programmer types, and I often wish I had a recorder when we get together and he starts telling the tales.


On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 4:26 PM, Seth Novogrodsky <[hidden email]> wrote:

Regarding Bill Gates and CP/M, IBM approached Microsoft about obtaining an OS for their PC because Digital Research wasn’t able to deliver on their schedule. Microsoft didn’t have an OS so they licensed an OS from  Seattle Computer Products. The OS that was essentially a clone of CP/M that ran on the 8088 processor.  (CP/M ran on the 8080 and Z80, not the newer 8086/8088. CP/M-86 came later.) There was no settlement from Microsoft for “stealing CP/M,” although there was an intellectual property dispute. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/86-DOS.

 

Seth

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard DESHONG
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2012 3:42 PM
To: Ryan Lovett
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

 

No, I don't think it was related to CSRG.  You might be thinking about Apple.  My understanding is that Gates used a "variant" of CP/M to create his first OS.  I wish I could remember people names (I'm more of an idea person), but the person that wrote most of the changes won a nice settlement from Microsoft in the early days.

 

On Thu, Dec 6, 2012 at 3:23 PM, Ryan Lovett <[hidden email]> wrote:

Do you mean the CSRG?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Systems_Research_Group

There had been a hallway sign in Evans misdirecting people to that defunct
group's non-existent office until a couple of years ago when a surge
department "corrected" the information.

Ryan


On Thu, Dec 06, 2012 at 01:21:49PM -0800, [hidden email] wrote:
> The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users
> Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead
> of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).



 

--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu




--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu


 
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gts
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Re: [Micronet] A Guide to Gifts for your Geek!

gts
In reply to this post by Ryan Lovett
No not CSRG.  The Scientific Computer Users Group was for use of the FORTRAN programming language on CP/M based personal computers.

I believe it was sponsored by Professor Charles Woodson of Education, now deceased like Gary Kildall in a personal aircraft accident. He was working with EECS on computer literacy. I also met him though the University of California Flying Club and through Amateur Radio.

greg

At 03:23 PM 12/6/2012, Ryan Lovett wrote:

>Do you mean the CSRG?
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Systems_Research_Group
>
>There had been a hallway sign in Evans misdirecting people to that defunct group's non-existent office until a couple of years ago when a surge department "corrected" the information.
>
>Ryan
>
>On Thu, Dec 06, 2012 at 01:21:49PM -0800, [hidden email] wrote:
>> The first computer group on campus was the Scientific Computer Users
>> Group which used CP/M systems and FORTRAN to run their problems (instead
>> of the campus CDC 6400 mainframe).


 
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