[Micronet] Printing Pauses and need Admin login to release

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[Micronet] Printing Pauses and need Admin login to release

Beth Muramoto
I've been meaning to ask this on Micronet for years, but I kept forgetting to and now it's likely to be a moot point with the newer OSes, but as always I appreciate any feedback and I'm hoping that this annoying process is "fixable". 

We're currently on Snow Leopard, but I'm going to be upgrading all our staff to Mountain Lion in March (hence the moot point probably because maybe this is fixed in the recent OSes, but curiosity is driving asking this anyway). 

In order to comply with campus security standards, all our staff computers have an admin login for most installs and updates which means me doing all that. Ever since Leopard, I think, networked printers whenever they paused, the only way to release them was to have me log in and do that. This gets frustrating for people on deadlines and it was even more frustrating when I was out these past two months on medical leave and the another person was part-time.

Does anyone know why this happens or what causes it because it's not consistent? Some people get it more often than others. Other than giving people the admin login is there a work around for it?

Lastly does this "feature" progress into Mountain Lion or is it "fixed" in that version? If yes, I may speed up my timetable.

Thanks for your patience as I explain things. If I've been vague, let me know.

Beth

P.S., I'll be sending a somewhat follow up question about Apple Remote Access and how effective it is for remote installations (e.g., only works for .pkg installations? How are admin login required installations handled in Apple Remote Access?)

--
***********************************************
Beth Muramoto
Computer Resource Specialist
Graduate School of Education
University of California, Berkeley
1650 Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
Email:  mailto:[hidden email]
Phone:  (510) 643-0203 
Fax:  (510) 643-6239

“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities have crept in – forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”

                            -Emerson

“Kind words do not cost much yet they accomplish much.” 

                            -Blaise Pascal

You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage to say 'no' to other things." 

-Stephen Covey

***********************************************


 
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Re: [Micronet] Printing Pauses and need Admin login to release

Graham Patterson

One option, which may have more side-effects than you want, would be to
add the user account to the Print Operators or Print Administrators groups.

Computer, HDD, System, Library, Core Services, Directory Utility.

>From the Directory Editor tab, select Groups, then find the group in the
list. Add the user account to the GroupMembers attribute.

I would take some screen grabs as you go so you can back it out if you
don't like the result. Then re-login and test that the access is what
you want.

If it was a CUPS printer, you could enable the CUPS web admin page. But
that opens up *everything*. A bit like using a chainsaw to cut a slice
of bread.

Graham

On 2/10/14 1:21 PM, Beth J MURAMOTO wrote:

> I've been meaning to ask this on Micronet for years, but I kept
> forgetting to and now it's likely to be a moot point with the newer
> OSes, but as always I appreciate any feedback and I'm hoping that this
> annoying process is "fixable".
>
> We're currently on Snow Leopard, but I'm going to be upgrading all our
> staff to Mountain Lion in March (hence the moot point probably because
> maybe this is fixed in the recent OSes, but curiosity is driving asking
> this anyway).
>
> In order to comply with campus security standards, all our staff
> computers have an admin login for most installs and updates which means
> me doing all that. Ever since Leopard, I think, networked printers
> whenever they paused, the only way to release them was to have me log in
> and do that. This gets frustrating for people on deadlines and it was
> even more frustrating when I was out these past two months on medical
> leave and the another person was part-time.
>
> Does anyone know why this happens or what causes it because it's not
> consistent? Some people get it more often than others. Other than giving
> people the admin login is there a work around for it?
>
> Lastly does this "feature" progress into Mountain Lion or is it "fixed"
> in that version? If yes, I may speed up my timetable.
>
> Thanks for your patience as I explain things. If I've been vague, let me
> know.
>
> Beth
>
> P.S., I'll be sending a somewhat follow up question about Apple Remote
> Access and how effective it is for remote installations (e.g., only
> works for .pkg installations? How are admin login required installations
> handled in Apple Remote Access?)
>
> --
> ***********************************************
> Beth Muramoto
> Computer Resource Specialist
> Graduate School of Education
> University of California, Berkeley
> 1650 Tolman Hall
> Berkeley, CA 94720
> Email:  mailto:[hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
> Phone:  (510) 643-0203
> Fax:  (510) 643-6239
>
> “Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some
> blunders and absurdities have crept in – forget them as soon as you can.
> Tomorrow is a new day. You shall begin it serenely and with too high a
> spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”
>
>                             -Emerson
>
> “Kind words do not cost much yet they accomplish much.”
>
>                             -Blaise Pascal
>
> You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage
> to say 'no' to other things."
>
> -Stephen Covey
>
> ***********************************************
>
>
>
>  
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.