[Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

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[Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
Hi,

I've just acquired a new Dell XPS8700 computer, running Windows 8.1.
After spending many hours (actually, days) installing new versions of
software and moving over hundreds of GB of data files from my old
(Windows 7) computer, I've discovered a problem that concerns me.

It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB,
which is where I would expect to keep most of my stuff.  Unfortunately
there is a home directory (\Users\Mike) on both disks, yet the one on C
is apparently preferred by most applications.  In particular, I'm
concerned about the Appdata and Program Data and Program Files folders,
which are likely to require more space than is available on the C disk.
For example, on my old Windows 7 system, my iPhone and iPad backups are
kept in C:\Appdata\Roaming.  (I haven't yet tried to backup or sync my
mobile devices on the new machine, especially because of the concern
noted above).

Is there something I can do about this that (I hope) won't involve my
having to reinstall everything from scratch?  For one thing, I notice
that C:\Users\Mike\Appdata and D:\Users\Mike\Appdata have both already
been used (in some cases by software that was pre-installed on the
machine), so I can't just create a shortcut of the  C version to the D
version.  Also, I should mention that it appears C: and D: are actually
two disks, not just two partitions.  I'm wary of proceeding with the
setup of my new computer, lest I do something that makes fixing this
even more difficult.

I hope one of you Windows experts can help with this.  Surely I'm not
the only one who has (or will) run into this situation.

Thanks.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Graham Patterson

Caveat: I have not tried doing this on a standalone Win 8+ workstation.
I have done it with servers.

It should be possible to create a Junction point (see the SysInternals
utility at sysinternals.com) to relocate a directory to the other drive.

I would not try this with a root directory like C:\AppData initially as
it may be difficult to get the permissions in place and also to rename
the old directory if some application is using it. Levels lower down
should be easier.

>From the perspective of most applications, the junction point is
invisible, but it does cause a management issue because of that. You
also need to be aware of what you backup tools do when they reach a
junction point. Some applications will follow them, others will not.

On servers this was a useful technique to 'expand' a drive when I had
extra space elsewhere. Certainly quicker than repartitioning. I used to
leave a text document at both ends of the junction to remind me what was
going on in addition to the normal configuration notes. You don't want
to delete a directory and trash most of a different 2TB partition.

The usual practices apply - be very clear where you start, keep good
notes, and have a backup/backout strategy. Practice in a temp directory
first!

The SysInternals tool is not the only way to do this on current OS
machines, but it has documentation you can read first.


Graham

On 2/3/15 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I've just acquired a new Dell XPS8700 computer, running Windows 8.1.
> After spending many hours (actually, days) installing new versions of
> software and moving over hundreds of GB of data files from my old
> (Windows 7) computer, I've discovered a problem that concerns me.
>
> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB,
> which is where I would expect to keep most of my stuff.  Unfortunately
> there is a home directory (\Users\Mike) on both disks, yet the one on C
> is apparently preferred by most applications.  In particular, I'm
> concerned about the Appdata and Program Data and Program Files folders,
> which are likely to require more space than is available on the C disk.
> For example, on my old Windows 7 system, my iPhone and iPad backups are
> kept in C:\Appdata\Roaming.  (I haven't yet tried to backup or sync my
> mobile devices on the new machine, especially because of the concern
> noted above).
>
> Is there something I can do about this that (I hope) won't involve my
> having to reinstall everything from scratch?  For one thing, I notice
> that C:\Users\Mike\Appdata and D:\Users\Mike\Appdata have both already
> been used (in some cases by software that was pre-installed on the
> machine), so I can't just create a shortcut of the  C version to the D
> version.  Also, I should mention that it appears C: and D: are actually
> two disks, not just two partitions.  I'm wary of proceeding with the
> setup of my new computer, lest I do something that makes fixing this
> even more difficult.
>
> I hope one of you Windows experts can help with this.  Surely I'm not
> the only one who has (or will) run into this situation.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Mike
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
On Win8, I believe you can use MKLINK to create Symbolic or Hard links, or a Directory Junction.  The Symbolic link is similar to a shortcut. I've successfully used a Symbolic link to "fool" an app into writing its data to another partition. Some will not and you then need to use a Directory Junction.

On Tue, Feb 3, 2015 at 1:25 PM, Graham Patterson <[hidden email]> wrote:

Caveat: I have not tried doing this on a standalone Win 8+ workstation.
I have done it with servers.

It should be possible to create a Junction point (see the SysInternals
utility at sysinternals.com) to relocate a directory to the other drive.

I would not try this with a root directory like C:\AppData initially as
it may be difficult to get the permissions in place and also to rename
the old directory if some application is using it. Levels lower down
should be easier.

>From the perspective of most applications, the junction point is
invisible, but it does cause a management issue because of that. You
also need to be aware of what you backup tools do when they reach a
junction point. Some applications will follow them, others will not.

On servers this was a useful technique to 'expand' a drive when I had
extra space elsewhere. Certainly quicker than repartitioning. I used to
leave a text document at both ends of the junction to remind me what was
going on in addition to the normal configuration notes. You don't want
to delete a directory and trash most of a different 2TB partition.

The usual practices apply - be very clear where you start, keep good
notes, and have a backup/backout strategy. Practice in a temp directory
first!

The SysInternals tool is not the only way to do this on current OS
machines, but it has documentation you can read first.


Graham

On 2/3/15 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I've just acquired a new Dell XPS8700 computer, running Windows 8.1.
> After spending many hours (actually, days) installing new versions of
> software and moving over hundreds of GB of data files from my old
> (Windows 7) computer, I've discovered a problem that concerns me.
>
> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB,
> which is where I would expect to keep most of my stuff.  Unfortunately
> there is a home directory (\Users\Mike) on both disks, yet the one on C
> is apparently preferred by most applications.  In particular, I'm
> concerned about the Appdata and Program Data and Program Files folders,
> which are likely to require more space than is available on the C disk.
> For example, on my old Windows 7 system, my iPhone and iPad backups are
> kept in C:\Appdata\Roaming.  (I haven't yet tried to backup or sync my
> mobile devices on the new machine, especially because of the concern
> noted above).
>
> Is there something I can do about this that (I hope) won't involve my
> having to reinstall everything from scratch?  For one thing, I notice
> that C:\Users\Mike\Appdata and D:\Users\Mike\Appdata have both already
> been used (in some cases by software that was pre-installed on the
> machine), so I can't just create a shortcut of the  C version to the D
> version.  Also, I should mention that it appears C: and D: are actually
> two disks, not just two partitions.  I'm wary of proceeding with the
> setup of my new computer, lest I do something that makes fixing this
> even more difficult.
>
> I hope one of you Windows experts can help with this.  Surely I'm not
> the only one who has (or will) run into this situation.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Mike
>


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-1984
"...past the iguana, the tyrannosaurus, the mastodon, the mathematical
puzzles, and the meteorite..." - used to be the directions to my office.


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--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
On 2015-02-03 14:26, Richard DESHONG wrote:
On Win8, I believe you can use MKLINK to create Symbolic or Hard links, or a Directory Junction.  The Symbolic link is similar to a shortcut. I've successfully used a Symbolic link to "fool" an app into writing its data to another partition. Some will not and you then need to use a Directory Junction.

Richard,

I tried invoking Link from a Power Shell and it couldn't find it.  Similarly, if I enter "Link" in the Run window.  Also, a global search doesn't turn up any information about Link.  Where is Link located?  I see it documented at sysinternals.com, so I just need to know how to actually run the command.

Mike

-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
On 2015-02-03 16:04, I wrote:

I tried invoking Link from a Power Shell and it couldn't find it.  Similarly, if I enter "Link" in the Run window.  Also, a global search doesn't turn up any information about Link.  Where is Link located?  I see it documented at sysinternals.com, so I just need to know how to actually run the command.

Richard

Apparently I messed up something with my Thunderbird spell checking.  Where it said "Link" I actually typed "mklink".  I hope my question is now clearer:  namely, where can I find the "mklink" command.

Mike

-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
I'm currently on a Win7 box.  I open cmd.exe and type mklink and it works.  It is part of the command shell, so maybe it is not available in Power Shell.

On Tue, Feb 3, 2015 at 4:14 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2015-02-03 16:04, I wrote:

I tried invoking Link from a Power Shell and it couldn't find it.  Similarly, if I enter "Link" in the Run window.  Also, a global search doesn't turn up any information about Link.  Where is Link located?  I see it documented at sysinternals.com, so I just need to know how to actually run the command.

Richard

Apparently I messed up something with my Thunderbird spell checking.  Where it said "Link" I actually typed "mklink".  I hope my question is now clearer:  namely, where can I find the "mklink" command.

Mike

-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com




--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
On 2015-02-03 16:45, Richard DESHONG wrote:
> I'm currently on a Win7 box.  I open cmd.exe and type mklink and it
> works.  It is part of the command shell, so maybe it is not available
> in Power Shell.

Richard,

You're right!  I can get to it from cmd.exe.  Now I just have to figure
out how best to use it to minimize the problems caused by the (IMHO)
stupid way this machine was pre-configured by Dell.

[BTW:  speaking as a retiree, I hope the new version of the Micronet
Charter reflects the participation of (and benefit to) those of us no
longer actually employed by UC].

Thanks again.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
Richard,

One more thing:  is there a way to reverse a link created with mklink?  I may want to do some testing and it would be nice if I could undo any link that I create during this process.

Mike

-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
Mike,
A junction can be removed with RD, since it appears to be a directory in the file system.  Also, there is an FSUTIL command, but I've not used it - google fsutil reparsepoint.

On Tue, Feb 3, 2015 at 7:46 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
Richard,

One more thing:  is there a way to reverse a link created with mklink?  I may want to do some testing and it would be nice if I could undo any link that I create during this process.

Mike

-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com




--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Mike Friedman
btw:  The "small C, big D" setup is a step in the direction of separating the machine setup from the user setup. This allows IT to image the C drive since, theoretically, there is no user data on it.

On Tue, Feb 3, 2015 at 6:21 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2015-02-03 16:45, Richard DESHONG wrote:
> I'm currently on a Win7 box.  I open cmd.exe and type mklink and it
> works.  It is part of the command shell, so maybe it is not available
> in Power Shell.

Richard,

You're right!  I can get to it from cmd.exe.  Now I just have to figure
out how best to use it to minimize the problems caused by the (IMHO)
stupid way this machine was pre-configured by Dell.

[BTW:  speaking as a retiree, I hope the new version of the Micronet
Charter reflects the participation of (and benefit to) those of us no
longer actually employed by UC].

Thanks again.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com




--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman

> On Feb 4, 2015, at 09:48, Richard DESHONG <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> btw:  The "small C, big D" setup is a step in the direction of separating the machine setup from the user setup. This allows IT to image the C drive since, theoretically, there is no user data on it.

Richard,

The key word here is "theoretically".  The configuration placed my home directory in "small C".  Well, lots of application data (does this count as "user data"?) gets put there, not the least of which, for example, is the Appdata folder where iTunes puts iPhone and iPad backups that can get quite large.  Also, I'm severely limited in how much data can go on my desktop (also in my home directory).  Then there's the fact that every piece of application software I install creates a folder in Appdata, as well as various files in Program Data.

In other words, the distinction between "data" and "system" stuff can be quite arbitrary.  Not to mention that there are two versions of my home directory, but application installations will mostly use the C version.  And, to make things even more difficult for me, some pre-installed software was put in my D home directory, so I can't just make a link from my C home directory to the D version, at least not without first merging both directories, copying the merged one to D and then replacing the C version with a link to the D version.  (I don't even know what the operational consequences of this will be for already installed programs)

All in all, quite a mess, based, it seems to me, on some flawed assumptions.

As a result, it's going to take me a couple of weeks or more to convert from my old computer (Win 7) to the new one.  I still don't know how I'm going to plan for ongoing maintenance (e.g., future software installation), given that I must be constantly aware of disk space usage over which I have little control.

Mike


_________________________________
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
Yes, assumptions, they can create quite a mess.

You do have a few IT techniques that can help.  One, "links", we've already discussed.  The other is "folder location".  Use Explorer to browse to your desktop folder (on C:), right-click, select Properties, and you'll see a [Location] tab.  This allows you to specify another location for your desktop folder, such as a folder on your data drive.  This operation is essentially the same as using MKLINK.

I use that technique when creating "roaming profiles", as that way the big data folders in a user's profile stay on the server and don't actually roam.  This cuts down on network traffic when a user logs in and out.

Going a bit further, you can use Windows Advanced user management, and there is a place to specify the location of your profile.  This is similar to the domain management tools, so I assume it works the same (I've only used the domain tools).  You could use this to create a user that has their profile only on your data drive.

Options, options, options.  Start with the big space hogs, and work your way down to "don't need to worry anymore".

On Wed, Feb 4, 2015 at 11:06 AM, MikeF <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Feb 4, 2015, at 09:48, Richard DESHONG <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> btw:  The "small C, big D" setup is a step in the direction of separating the machine setup from the user setup. This allows IT to image the C drive since, theoretically, there is no user data on it.

Richard,

The key word here is "theoretically".  The configuration placed my home directory in "small C".  Well, lots of application data (does this count as "user data"?) gets put there, not the least of which, for example, is the Appdata folder where iTunes puts iPhone and iPad backups that can get quite large.  Also, I'm severely limited in how much data can go on my desktop (also in my home directory).  Then there's the fact that every piece of application software I install creates a folder in Appdata, as well as various files in Program Data.

In other words, the distinction between "data" and "system" stuff can be quite arbitrary.  Not to mention that there are two versions of my home directory, but application installations will mostly use the C version.  And, to make things even more difficult for me, some pre-installed software was put in my D home directory, so I can't just make a link from my C home directory to the D version, at least not without first merging both directories, copying the merged one to D and then replacing the C version with a link to the D version.  (I don't even know what the operational consequences of this will be for already installed programs)

All in all, quite a mess, based, it seems to me, on some flawed assumptions.

As a result, it's going to take me a couple of weeks or more to convert from my old computer (Win 7) to the new one.  I still don't know how I'm going to plan for ongoing maintenance (e.g., future software installation), given that I must be constantly aware of disk space usage over which I have little control.

Mike


_________________________________
*** Sent from my iPad ***



--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
I just tried my first mklink, with bad results.  Here's the command I typed within cmd.exe (running as Administrator).  I'm trying to create a hard link from the 'backup' file on C to the same path on D:

mklink /D /H c:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup d:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup

And I got back this message:

The system cannot move the file to a different disk drive

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

Mike


-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Richard DeShong-2
Hard Links are part of the NTSF file system - pointing one location in the file system to another location in the file system.  Each partition has it's own file system, so you can not create a hard link in one system that points to a location in another.

I don't remember if Junctions can point to another file system, but Symbolic links can.  They're your friend, in this situation - cozy up to them.

On Wed, Feb 4, 2015 at 5:06 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
I just tried my first mklink, with bad results.  Here's the command I typed within cmd.exe (running as Administrator).  I'm trying to create a hard link from the 'backup' file on C to the same path on D:

mklink /D /H c:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup d:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup

And I got back this message:

The system cannot move the file to a different disk drive

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

Mike


-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com




--
Richard DeShong, Systems Analyst, Athletic Study Center, U.C.Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center, Berkeley, CA, 94720-4220
510-642-5123     asc.berkeley.edu

 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
In reply to this post by Mike Friedman
Never mind.  I realize I needed to create a junction, not a directory hard link, since I'm crossing disk boundaries.

It seems to have worked, though it's hard to tell what's going on using the File Explorer GUI.  A 'dir' command does show me that the 'backup' file on C is actually a junction referring to the correct path on D.  Also, I created a folder within 'backup' on C and it appeared in 'backup' on D.  So, I guess now I'll see whether iTunes does the right thing when I backup my iPhone.

Mike


On 2015-02-04 17:06, Mike Friedman wrote:
I just tried my first mklink, with bad results.  Here's the command I typed within cmd.exe (running as Administrator).  I'm trying to create a hard link from the 'backup' file on C to the same path on D:

mklink /D /H c:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup d:\Users\Mike\Appdata\Roaming\"Apple Computer"\MobileSync\backup

And I got back this message:

The system cannot move the file to a different disk drive

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks.

Mike


-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com



-- 
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

David Schwartz
In reply to this post by Mike Friedman
On Feb 3, 2015, at 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB…

I can’t offer any suggestions on how to manage your data in Windows, but it’s likely the 250G device is an SSD. What files you put on the fast storage and what you store on the slower spinning drive would be an additional consideration.


David
 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Mike Friedman
On 2015-02-06 08:32, David Schwartz wrote:
> On Feb 3, 2015, at 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
>> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB…
> I can’t offer any suggestions on how to manage your data in Windows, but it’s likely the 250G device is an SSD. What files you put on the fast storage and what you store on the slower spinning drive would be an additional consideration.

David,

Yes, you're right, it is an SSD.  Which no doubt accounts for the fast
start up.  Booting up and logging on takes almost no time at all (not
more than 10 seconds), much faster than my prior machine (a four
processor quad core which I used to think was quite fast).

So, the real problem is not so much the separate C drive.  If they had
only configured a single hard link (actually Junction) of my home
directory to the D drive I wouldn't be having most of the space
management issues I'm currently dealing with.  Right now, I've got
things sort of under control because I've linked the specific Appdata
iTunes backup file to the large drive.  For now, that's the main place
that contains lots of data and that's in my home directory.  But so many
other things get stored in my home directory and unfortunately it was
allocated on both C and D and populated in both places, making it
difficult for me now to create such a link.  In particular there are two
Appdata folders, one each on C and D, and it could be dicey for me to
consolidate them onto D.

Anyway, I've mentioned this before.  Your point about optimizing the use
of the fast SSD on file by file basis is well taken, but not something I
expect to spend much time doing.

Thanks.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Jay Bryon
I found having the OS and applications on SSD, and files on HD is reasonable, both from performance and fussing perspectives.  

On Fri, Feb 6, 2015 at 9:15 AM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2015-02-06 08:32, David Schwartz wrote:
> On Feb 3, 2015, at 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
>> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB…
> I can’t offer any suggestions on how to manage your data in Windows, but it’s likely the 250G device is an SSD. What files you put on the fast storage and what you store on the slower spinning drive would be an additional consideration.

David,

Yes, you're right, it is an SSD.  Which no doubt accounts for the fast
start up.  Booting up and logging on takes almost no time at all (not
more than 10 seconds), much faster than my prior machine (a four
processor quad core which I used to think was quite fast).

So, the real problem is not so much the separate C drive.  If they had
only configured a single hard link (actually Junction) of my home
directory to the D drive I wouldn't be having most of the space
management issues I'm currently dealing with.  Right now, I've got
things sort of under control because I've linked the specific Appdata
iTunes backup file to the large drive.  For now, that's the main place
that contains lots of data and that's in my home directory.  But so many
other things get stored in my home directory and unfortunately it was
allocated on both C and D and populated in both places, making it
difficult for me now to create such a link.  In particular there are two
Appdata folders, one each on C and D, and it could be dicey for me to
consolidate them onto D.

Anyway, I've mentioned this before.  Your point about optimizing the use
of the fast SSD on file by file basis is well taken, but not something I
expect to spend much time doing.

Thanks.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com



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--
Jay Bryon
Senior Network Engineer, U.C. Berkeley/IST/IS/Network Operations and Services 
2-5636


 
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Re: [Micronet] Problem with new computer disk setup

Sean McMahon
Agreed! I keep my data on my large HDs, and OS and applications on my SSD C drive , and point the applications (Lightroom, iTunes , Adobe Premiere , etc.) to their respective file directories on the HDs. When I upgraded my computer to an SSD C drive it did take some time to juggle the files onto two other internal drives and my NAS and cloud storage, and re-install the applications. It was quite the effort, well worth it with the speed of the SSD. Along with a new video card I upped my Windows Experience Index from a 5.6 to 7.1 (out of possible 7.9), and I have a ton of applications installed. I didn't reach into the command line, basically moved directories around and pointed the applications to those new locations from the application, then went back and removed any extra empty/unnecessary directories on the C drive. Thanks for posting this topic. Enjoy your new rig!

Best regards, 

Sean

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 6, 2015, at 10:46, Jay BRYON <[hidden email]> wrote:

I found having the OS and applications on SSD, and files on HD is reasonable, both from performance and fussing perspectives.  

On Fri, Feb 6, 2015 at 9:15 AM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 2015-02-06 08:32, David Schwartz wrote:
> On Feb 3, 2015, at 1:06 PM, Mike Friedman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> It seems the computer was configured with two disks, a relatively small
>> C drive (about 250 GB) and a D ("DATA") drive containing almost 2TB…
> I can’t offer any suggestions on how to manage your data in Windows, but it’s likely the 250G device is an SSD. What files you put on the fast storage and what you store on the slower spinning drive would be an additional consideration.

David,

Yes, you're right, it is an SSD.  Which no doubt accounts for the fast
start up.  Booting up and logging on takes almost no time at all (not
more than 10 seconds), much faster than my prior machine (a four
processor quad core which I used to think was quite fast).

So, the real problem is not so much the separate C drive.  If they had
only configured a single hard link (actually Junction) of my home
directory to the D drive I wouldn't be having most of the space
management issues I'm currently dealing with.  Right now, I've got
things sort of under control because I've linked the specific Appdata
iTunes backup file to the large drive.  For now, that's the main place
that contains lots of data and that's in my home directory.  But so many
other things get stored in my home directory and unfortunately it was
allocated on both C and D and populated in both places, making it
difficult for me now to create such a link.  In particular there are two
Appdata folders, one each on C and D, and it could be dicey for me to
consolidate them onto D.

Anyway, I've mentioned this before.  Your point about optimizing the use
of the fast SSD on file by file basis is well taken, but not something I
expect to spend much time doing.

Thanks.

Mike

--
Mike Friedman
[hidden email]
http://mikefberkeley.com



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--
Jay Bryon
Senior Network Engineer, U.C. Berkeley/IST/IS/Network Operations and Services 
2-5636


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