[Micronet] Question about historical numbers of computers on campus

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
2 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

[Micronet] Question about historical numbers of computers on campus

Lisa McNeilly
Good morning.

I'm working on the Campus Sustainability Report and want to include a short section describing how the campus has changed since 1990 (which is the baseline year for many of our goals).  One metric that I thought might be interesting is the number of computers (including servers) on campus then (or that era) versus now.  Does anyone have any thoughts on this?  An approximation would more than adequate.

Thanks,
Lisa

Lisa McNeilly
Director of Sustainability
University of California, Berkeley

203 A&E, MC 1382
Berkeley, CA  94720-1382
(510) 643-5907


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [Micronet] Question about historical numbers of computers on campus

Al Stangenberger
Lisa -

If you're interested in the growth curve of the number of computers on
campus, an earlier data point of interest might be about 1984-1986, when
IBM gave a big equipment grant to campus (DACE, the Distributed Academic
Computing Environment).  This jump-started a lot of departmental
facilities (for example, Forestry got 12 PC-XT's which started our
teaching lab).

At a symposium at the end of the grant, Prof. (now emeritus) Charles
Faulhaber gave a talk in which he compared the explosive growth of
personal computers to the explosive growth in printing and publishing
after Gutenberg invented movable type.  The curves were virtually
identical.  You might check with him for numbers and more information on
the DACE grant.

Property Management might be able to give you some numbers of computers
on campus if their inventory records go that far back.

Al Stangenberger
PA III (Ret.), ESPM / Forestry

On 8/8/2013 8:53 AM, Lisa McNeilly wrote:

> Good morning.
>
> I'm working on the Campus Sustainability Report and want to include a
> short section describing how the campus has changed since 1990 (which is
> the baseline year for many of our goals).  One metric that I thought
> might be interesting is the number of computers (including servers) on
> campus then (or that era) versus now.  Does anyone have any thoughts on
> this?  An approximation would more than adequate.
>
> Thanks,
> Lisa
>
> Lisa McNeilly
> Director of Sustainability
> University of California, Berkeley
>
> 203 A&E, MC 1382
> Berkeley, CA  94720-1382
> (510) 643-5907
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>

 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.