[Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

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[Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Stuart Damon
Dear, Micronet,

I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his C: on his computer.

He performed this task successfully. 

However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it would be fine.

Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating system.

In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible, as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the drive.

He is desperate to get his data back.

I have tried to access the HD by:

1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as an external via a USB connection.
4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if it would even be recognized.
6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment conflict and booting.

At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and his data recovered.

We would be very grateful for any suggestions.

--
Best regards, Stuart Damon
Computer Resource Specialist II
College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
University of California, Berkeley
42 Giannini Hall 
Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
[hidden email]
Tel: (510) 643-8481

Open A Technical Support Ticket!
CNR folks can simply send an email to [hidden email]


 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Graham Patterson
What does the Disk section of the Computer Management tool have to say
about the second drive? Does it see it? Was it encrypted (best hope not)?

Graham

On 1/20/11 9:33 AM, Stuart Damon wrote:

> Dear, Micronet,
>
> I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his
> C: on his computer.
>
> He performed this task successfully.
>
> However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer
> which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it
> would be fine.
>
> Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are
> recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating
> system.
>
> In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible,
> as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the
> drive.
>
> He is desperate to get his data back.
>
> I have tried to access the HD by:
>
> 1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
> 2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
> 3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as
> an external via a USB connection.
> 4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
> 5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if
> it would even be recognized.
> 6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment
> conflict and booting.
>
> At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest
> for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and
> his data recovered.
>
> We would be very grateful for any suggestions.
>
> --
> Best regards, Stuart Damon
> Computer Resource Specialist II
> College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
> http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
> University of California, Berkeley
> 42 Giannini Hall
> Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
> [hidden email]
> Tel: (510) 643-8481
>
> */Open A Technical Support Ticket!/
> **CNR folks can simply send an email to****[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>***
>
>
>
>  
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> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
"...past the Tyranosaurus, the Mastodon, the mathematical puzzles, and
the meteorite..." - directions to my office.

 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Stuart Damon

Stuart,

Not quite sure why you keep attempting to boot from the drive.

Or why you’re using the XP CD - that would be for installing the OS.

If it was a slave drive, then there’d be no OS from which to boot.

Anyway, you say his BIOS recognizes the drive.

If so, then does Windows Disk Management see it?

What was the reason for the re-install of Windows?

Whatever the cause for that, might have affected this drive.

 

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Stuart Damon
Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2011 9:34 AM
To: 'micronet'
Subject: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

 

Dear, Micronet,

I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his C: on his computer.

He performed this task successfully. 

However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it would be fine.

Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating system.

In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible, as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the drive.

He is desperate to get his data back.

I have tried to access the HD by:

1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as an external via a USB connection.
4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if it would even be recognized.
6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment conflict and booting.

At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and his data recovered.

We would be very grateful for any suggestions.

--
Best regards, Stuart Damon

Computer Resource Specialist II
College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
University of California, Berkeley
42 Giannini Hall 
Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
[hidden email]
Tel: (510) 643-8481

Open A Technical Support Ticket!
CNR folks can simply send an email to [hidden email]


 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Tom Salinaro
In reply to this post by Stuart Damon
My guess is that it might be a driver issue. Maybe before he reformatted he had a different driver installed for that device.
Check out what's going on in Device Manager and check the net for that HDD.
If that doesn't work:
Maybe try setting the drive as Master Select.
Try another boot disk (other than the Windows CD) like the UBCD to see if it shows up.
Reset BIOS defaults.
Try another cable (I know you said it was rec in bios, but it can't hurt).




On 1/20/2011 9:33 AM, Stuart Damon wrote:
Dear, Micronet,

I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his C: on his computer.

He performed this task successfully. 

However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it would be fine.

Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating system.

In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible, as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the drive.

He is desperate to get his data back.

I have tried to access the HD by:

1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as an external via a USB connection.
4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if it would even be recognized.
6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment conflict and booting.

At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and his data recovered.

We would be very grateful for any suggestions.

--
Best regards, Stuart Damon
Computer Resource Specialist II
College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
University of California, Berkeley
42 Giannini Hall 
Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
[hidden email]
Tel: (510) 643-8481

Open A Technical Support Ticket!
CNR folks can simply send an email to [hidden email]

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-- 
Tom Salinaro
UC Berkeley
Physical Education Program
200 Hearst Gym

 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Jon Forrest
On 1/20/2011 1:32 PM, Tom Salinaro wrote:
> My guess is that it might be a driver issue. Maybe before he reformatted
> he had a different driver installed for that device.

Disk drives rarely require specific drivers.

I'll bet $.05 that the drive letter for
this drive changed. Once he finds the new
drive letter, which should be easy, then
all will be well.

That or a disaster really did occur.

Jon

 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Robert Hiramoto
In reply to this post by Graham Patterson
Hi everyone,

I think Graham's advice is spot on - if Disk Management can see the drive,
and give a status of that drive, then that should show what's wrong.

The professor may have to "import foreign disks" in Disk Management.

See this link for disk management trouble messages:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en
-us/sag_disktrouble.mspx?mfr=true


~Robert
*******************************************************************
Robert Hiramoto
IT Manager
Institute for Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE)
University of California, Berkeley
2521 Channing Way #5555
Berkeley, CA 94720-5555
 
Phone:  (510) 643-3903
Fax:  (510) 642-6432

 
Office Hours:
Monday - Friday:  8:00 am to 4:00 pm





On 1/20/11 12:19 PM, "Graham Patterson" <[hidden email]> wrote:

>What does the Disk section of the Computer Management tool have to say
>about the second drive? Does it see it? Was it encrypted (best hope not)?
>
>Graham
>
>On 1/20/11 9:33 AM, Stuart Damon wrote:
>> Dear, Micronet,
>>
>> I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his
>> C: on his computer.
>>
>> He performed this task successfully.
>>
>> However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer
>> which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it
>> would be fine.
>>
>> Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are
>> recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating
>> system.
>>
>> In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible,
>> as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the
>> drive.
>>
>> He is desperate to get his data back.
>>
>> I have tried to access the HD by:
>>
>> 1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
>> 2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
>> 3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as
>> an external via a USB connection.
>> 4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
>> 5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if
>> it would even be recognized.
>> 6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment
>> conflict and booting.
>>
>> At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest
>> for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and
>> his data recovered.
>>
>> We would be very grateful for any suggestions.
>>
>> --
>> Best regards, Stuart Damon
>> Computer Resource Specialist II
>> College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
>> http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
>> University of California, Berkeley
>> 42 Giannini Hall
>> Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
>> [hidden email]
>> Tel: (510) 643-8481
>>
>> */Open A Technical Support Ticket!/
>> **CNR folks can simply send an email to****[hidden email]
>> <mailto:[hidden email]>***
>>
>>
>>
>>  
>>
>>-------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list
>>server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or
>>unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming
>>meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable,
>>and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.
>>This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
>>prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>--
>Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
>Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley   510-643-2222
>"...past the Tyranosaurus, the Mastodon, the mathematical puzzles, and
>the meteorite..." - directions to my office.
>
>
>-------------------------------------------------------------------------
>The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
>To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or
>unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming
>meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
>http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
>Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
>means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
>prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.



 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Guy D. VINSON
In reply to this post by Jon Forrest
You should be able see it in Disk manager even if there is some drive letters conflict issue.

Boot a box from a linux boot system, bypassing windows, and see if you can see the drive. You should also make sure it is even spinning up with power, if not then SOL
---
Guy Vinson
Infrastructure & IT
College of Environmental Design
510-842-7199



On Thu, Jan 20, 2011 at 1:48 PM, Jon Forrest <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 1/20/2011 1:32 PM, Tom Salinaro wrote:
> My guess is that it might be a driver issue. Maybe before he reformatted
> he had a different driver installed for that device.

Disk drives rarely require specific drivers.

I'll bet $.05 that the drive letter for
this drive changed. Once he finds the new
drive letter, which should be easy, then
all will be well.

That or a disaster really did occur.

Jon


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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Bruce Satow
In reply to this post by Jon Forrest
Sometimes you have to re-add the drive into Windows.  If the disk
management tool within the computer management, and the disk is listed,
but not mounted, if you right mouse click on it, it should give you the
option of adding or mounting the volume.  Once this is done, you should
be able to access the data again.  (Make sure that you have this
external HD backed up on another machine before trying.)  Note: you
should do this logged in as administrator, not administrator equivalent
account.





On 1/20/2011 1:48 PM, Jon Forrest wrote:

> On 1/20/2011 1:32 PM, Tom Salinaro wrote:
>> My guess is that it might be a driver issue. Maybe before he reformatted
>> he had a different driver installed for that device.
> Disk drives rarely require specific drivers.
>
> I'll bet $.05 that the drive letter for
> this drive changed. Once he finds the new
> drive letter, which should be easy, then
> all will be well.
>
> That or a disaster really did occur.
>
> Jon
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

--
Bruce Satow
University of California at Berkeley
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, California 94720-7450
(510) 643-2348

AST:7731^29u18e3

When you're doing things right, everybody thinks you are not doing anything at all.


 
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Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2

Stuart,

What I would do is connect it to another system.  You didn’t mention controller/cable type.  I would try to connect it to a system using it’s own cable.  Master - Slave’ing drives doesn’t always work properly.  So, if needed, I would set the jumper on the drive to be a Master, and connect to another system by it’s own cable.  At this point, Windows DM should see the drive.  If not, then then you will need to use a drive recovery system to retrieve the data.  This can a service, such a Drive Savers, or you can try a s/w app such as Fujitsu’s Final Data.  Good luck.

--

Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst

Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley

164 Chavez Student Center

510-642-5123 office

925-285-1088 cell

asc.berkeley.edu

 

 

 

From: Stuart Damon [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 9:19 AM
To: Richard DeShong
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

 

Richard,

Since I was not present when he reinstalled the O.S., I am not sure what steps he did if any to make this go south. For this reason, I though I would try and boot is as a Master (just in case he installed a new O.S. on it as well). I tried the XP CD not to intstall anything, but just to see if I bypassed the Masters operating system I could see the drive in question. Disk Management does not see it.  The professor tells my that he reinstalled the O.S. because it had a virus.  I think you have a good point in that it is possible that the reason he reinstalled the O.S. may also be the cause of the failure on the slave.  Thank you for your input!

Best regards, Stuart Damon

Computer Resource Specialist II
College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
University of California, Berkeley
42 Giannini Hall 
Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
[hidden email]
Tel: (510) 643-8481

Open A Technical Support Ticket!
CNR folks can simply send an email to [hidden email]


On 1/20/2011 12:57 PM, Richard DeShong wrote:

Stuart,

Not quite sure why you keep attempting to boot from the drive.

Or why you’re using the XP CD - that would be for installing the OS.

If it was a slave drive, then there’d be no OS from which to boot.

Anyway, you say his BIOS recognizes the drive.

If so, then does Windows Disk Management see it?

What was the reason for the re-install of Windows?

Whatever the cause for that, might have affected this drive.

 

 

 

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Stuart Damon
Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2011 9:34 AM
To: 'micronet'
Subject: [Micronet] Slave HD w/ Data, No Longer Recognized by Operating System.

 

Dear, Micronet,

I have a professor who reinstalled a Windows XP Operating System to his C: on his computer.

He performed this task successfully. 

However, there was also was another Hard-Drive (F:) on this computer which had lots of data that he ignored, thinking if he left it alone it would be fine.

Now, while the computer operates fine, and both hard-drives are recognized in the BIOS, the F: is no longer recognized in the operating system.

In fact, even if he wanted to reformat this HD it would not be possible, as when he boots off the Windows XP CD, it still does not recognize the drive.

He is desperate to get his data back.

I have tried to access the HD by:

1)  Installing it in other computers as a slave and booting.
2) Changing it from slave to master and booting off it.
3) Connecting it a P-ATA / IDE Disaster recovery kit that access it as an external via a USB connection.
4) Resetting the BIOS on the original computer and booting.
5) Booting off the Windows XP disc (as the professor did) and seeing if it would even be recognized.
6) Disconnecting the DVD and CD disc drives to avoid a drive assignment conflict and booting.

At this point I thought we would ask U.C. Berkeley's best and brightest for any suggestions on how we could get this drive to be recognized and his data recovered.

We would be very grateful for any suggestions.

--
Best regards, Stuart Damon

Computer Resource Specialist II
College of Natural Resources (Dean's Office)
http://nature.berkeley.edu/site/computing.php
University of California, Berkeley
42 Giannini Hall 
Berkeley, CA 94720-3114
[hidden email]
Tel: (510) 643-8481

Open A Technical Support Ticket!
CNR folks can simply send an email to [hidden email]

 
 
 
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