[Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

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[Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Richard DeShong-2
Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu




 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Greg Merritt
Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?

-Greg

> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Ian Crew
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
It's a couple of years out of date, but there's a pretty decent overview of the issues surrounding this sort of thing included as part of the UC Berkeley Collaborative Tools Strategy.  See http://technology.berkeley.edu/cio/presentations/ucbcts/ucbcts_spotlight-legal_and_policy.pdf for the overview, and http://technology.berkeley.edu/cio/presentations/ucbcts/ for the whole strategy.

There's also a bunch of relevant info in the Campus Online Activities Policy, at http://technology.berkeley.edu/policy/online.html

Hope that's at least vaguely useful.....

Cheers,

Ian
(Please note that I'm just sharing what I know here, not speaking officially for IST in any way.)


On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:16 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:

Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu





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Ian Crew
Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
University of California, Berkeley
2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Noam Manor
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
well.

Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
that the University provides?

For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?

On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?

Noam

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu




 
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visit the Micronet Web site:

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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Greg Merritt
Certainly, on a legal level, it depends on the interpretation of the picture
that the information paints.  But this isn't just about what can ultimately
cause a guilty verdict.  It's more about the environment that the University
provides for our conversations.  The discussion between students, faculty,
and staff.

When a group of students, faculty, and staff are in a discussion related to
class, what expectations are there that the discussion is managed by the
University?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Greg Merritt Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:25 AM

Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?
-Greg

> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Ian Crew

Thanks, Ian, I’ll take a look to see if I can parse out what I need.

--

Richard DeShong

 

From: Ian Crew [mailto:[hidden email]]     Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:40 AM

It's a couple of years out of date, but there's a pretty decent overview of the issues surrounding this sort of thing included as part of the UC Berkeley Collaborative Tools Strategy.  See http://technology.berkeley.edu/cio/presentations/ucbcts/ucbcts_spotlight-legal_and_policy.pdf for the overview, and http://technology.berkeley.edu/cio/presentations/ucbcts/ for the whole strategy.

 

There's also a bunch of relevant info in the Campus Online Activities Policy, at http://technology.berkeley.edu/policy/online.html

 

Hope that's at least vaguely useful.....

 

Cheers,

Ian

(Please note that I'm just sharing what I know here, not speaking officially for IST in any way.)

 

 

On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:16 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:



Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu





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To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 

Ian Crew

Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub

Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies

University of California, Berkeley

2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor

 


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Noam Manor
Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Noam Manor Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM

Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
well.

Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
that the University provides?

For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?

On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?

Noam

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu




 
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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Aron Roberts
Noam Manor wrote:
> Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
> that the University provides?

And Richard DeShong sagely replied:
> Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?

A brief follow-up to the entire Micronet community: if you know of a
campus technology-related service that *isn't* yet in Tech Commons,
please add it.  This site relies on community-provided contributions
from you and others:

http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/tech-commons

Aron Roberts
Information Services and Technology

> --
> Richard DeShong
>
>
> From: Noam Manor        Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM
>
> Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
> well.
>
> Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
> that the University provides?
>
> For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
> forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?
>
> On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
> complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
> the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
> Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
> instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?
>
> Noam
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
> DeShong
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
> Dear Micronet,
> I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
> to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
> the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
> process goes like this:
>
> A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
> B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
> C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.
>
> I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
> guidelines.  Here's two that I have:
>
> 1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
> an existing commercial contract.
>
> This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
> commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
> service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
> bspace.
>
> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?
>
> I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
> seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
> have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.
>
> --
> Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
> Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
> 164 Chavez Student Center
> 510-642-5123 office
> 925-285-1088 cell
> asc.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Ian Crew
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
That's the idea of that site, yes.  

(Actually, non-university-provided stuff that's in use on campus should be there too--the more we know and share about what we're all using, the easier it'll be to make smart choices.)

The cool thing about that site is that anyone with a CalNet ID can create a new page, or provide a correction or update to an existing page.  Give it a try!


Cheers,

Ian
(Yet another disclaimer: I was involved with the creation of the TechCommons site, but I'm not currently on that project....)

On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:51 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:

Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Noam Manor Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM

Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
well.

Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
that the University provides?

For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?

On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?

Noam

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu





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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
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employers, and people who have known you in the past.



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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

Ian Crew
Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
University of California, Berkeley
2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Satya Levine
Hi Ian,

 

Does a listing on techcommons indicate that a product had been approved by
the university? Also, is the idea that techcommons may be a seed for an
internal campus social network for sharing tools, tips, soliciting advice,
etc.?

 

Thanks,

Satya

 

Satya Levine

Communications Coordinator

UC Berkeley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

1925 Walnut St. #1570

Berkeley, CA 94720-1570

Tel: 510.642.5254

Fax: 510.642.2202

http://olli.berkeley.edu

 

 

 

From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:06 PM
To: Richard DeShong
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

 

That's the idea of that site, yes.  

 

(Actually, non-university-provided stuff that's in use on campus should be
there too--the more we know and share about what we're all using, the easier
it'll be to make smart choices.)

 

The cool thing about that site is that anyone with a CalNet ID can create a
new page, or provide a correction or update to an existing page.  Give it a
try!

 

See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/tech-commons for more details.

 

Cheers,

 

Ian

(Yet another disclaimer: I was involved with the creation of the TechCommons
site, but I'm not currently on that project....)

 

On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:51 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:





Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Noam Manor    Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM

Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
well.

Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
that the University provides?

For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?

On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?

Noam

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Dear Micronet,
I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
process goes like this:

A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.

I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
guidelines.  Here's two that I have:

1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
an existing commercial contract.

This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
bspace.

2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
released to the public?

I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.

--
Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
164 Chavez Student Center
510-642-5123 office
925-285-1088 cell
asc.berkeley.edu





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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 

Ian Crew

Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub

Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies

University of California, Berkeley

2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor

http://hub.berkeley.edu

 


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Ian Crew
Hi Satya:

The TechCommons is purely crowdsourced, so a listing there does not inherently confer any official approval. The fact that there's a listing only says that someone in our community took the time to enter that product into the system.  

See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/faq for a bunch more FAQs about it.  (But not that one.  I'd suggest you contact the TechCommons support team at [hidden email] and suggest that one--it's a good one.)

And yes, the hope of the TechCommons is that it will be a source of tips, advice, best practices, etc.  That's the major reason we worked so hard to make it crowdsourced.  That way, if you enter a product, but I have a tip or a trick, or more details about it, I can go in and share those with the community.  (To re emphasize, you have to have a CalNet ID to create or edit anything there, and all changes are tracked, so it's a pretty safe and accountable place.)

Cheers,

Ian

On Jan 25, 2012, at 1:05 PM, Satya Levine wrote:

> Hi Ian,
>
>
>
> Does a listing on techcommons indicate that a product had been approved by
> the university? Also, is the idea that techcommons may be a seed for an
> internal campus social network for sharing tools, tips, soliciting advice,
> etc.?
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Satya
>
>
>
> Satya Levine
>
> Communications Coordinator
>
> UC Berkeley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
>
> 1925 Walnut St. #1570
>
> Berkeley, CA 94720-1570
>
> Tel: 510.642.5254
>
> Fax: 510.642.2202
>
> http://olli.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:06 PM
> To: Richard DeShong
> Cc: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
>
>
> That's the idea of that site, yes.  
>
>
>
> (Actually, non-university-provided stuff that's in use on campus should be
> there too--the more we know and share about what we're all using, the easier
> it'll be to make smart choices.)
>
>
>
> The cool thing about that site is that anyone with a CalNet ID can create a
> new page, or provide a correction or update to an existing page.  Give it a
> try!
>
>
>
> See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/tech-commons for more details.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Ian
>
> (Yet another disclaimer: I was involved with the creation of the TechCommons
> site, but I'm not currently on that project....)
>
>
>
> On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:51 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
> --
> Richard DeShong
>
>
> From: Noam Manor    Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM
>
> Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
> well.
>
> Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
> that the University provides?
>
> For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
> forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?
>
> On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
> complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
> the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
> Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account, for
> instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?
>
> Noam
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
> DeShong
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
> Dear Micronet,
> I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial services
> to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is that
> the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
> process goes like this:
>
> A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
> B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
> C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.
>
> I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
> guidelines.  Here's two that I have:
>
> 1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
> an existing commercial contract.
>
> This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
> commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
> service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead of
> bspace.
>
> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?
>
> I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
> seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
> have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.
>
> --
> Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
> Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
> 164 Chavez Student Center
> 510-642-5123 office
> 925-285-1088 cell
> asc.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> Ian Crew
>
> Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
>
> Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
>
> University of California, Berkeley
>
> 2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
>
> http://hub.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
> <winmail.dat>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

Ian Crew
Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
University of California, Berkeley
2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
http://hub.berkeley.edu


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Noam Manor
So the question remains: is there a way to find out about all of the online
and IT services provided and approved by the campus.
There have been a number of announcements recently about new agreements, but
it would be helpful to know what else might be available.

Noam




-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:16 PM
To: Satya Levine
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Hi Satya:

The TechCommons is purely crowdsourced, so a listing there does not
inherently confer any official approval. The fact that there's a listing
only says that someone in our community took the time to enter that product
into the system.  

See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/faq for a bunch more FAQs about it.
(But not that one.  I'd suggest you contact the TechCommons support team at
[hidden email] and suggest that one--it's a good one.)

And yes, the hope of the TechCommons is that it will be a source of tips,
advice, best practices, etc.  That's the major reason we worked so hard to
make it crowdsourced.  That way, if you enter a product, but I have a tip or
a trick, or more details about it, I can go in and share those with the
community.  (To re emphasize, you have to have a CalNet ID to create or edit
anything there, and all changes are tracked, so it's a pretty safe and
accountable place.)

Cheers,

Ian

On Jan 25, 2012, at 1:05 PM, Satya Levine wrote:

> Hi Ian,
>
>
>
> Does a listing on techcommons indicate that a product had been approved by
> the university? Also, is the idea that techcommons may be a seed for an
> internal campus social network for sharing tools, tips, soliciting advice,
> etc.?
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Satya
>
>
>
> Satya Levine
>
> Communications Coordinator
>
> UC Berkeley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
>
> 1925 Walnut St. #1570
>
> Berkeley, CA 94720-1570
>
> Tel: 510.642.5254
>
> Fax: 510.642.2202
>
> http://olli.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:06 PM
> To: Richard DeShong
> Cc: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
>
>
> That's the idea of that site, yes.  
>
>
>
> (Actually, non-university-provided stuff that's in use on campus should be
> there too--the more we know and share about what we're all using, the
easier
> it'll be to make smart choices.)
>
>
>
> The cool thing about that site is that anyone with a CalNet ID can create
a
> new page, or provide a correction or update to an existing page.  Give it
a

> try!
>
>
>
> See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/tech-commons for more details.
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Ian
>
> (Yet another disclaimer: I was involved with the creation of the
TechCommons

> site, but I'm not currently on that project....)
>
>
>
> On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:51 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
> --
> Richard DeShong
>
>
> From: Noam Manor    Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM
>
> Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
> well.
>
> Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
> that the University provides?
>
> For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
> forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?
>
> On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
> complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
> the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
> Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account,
for

> instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?
>
> Noam
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
> DeShong
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
> Dear Micronet,
> I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial
services
> to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is
that

> the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
> process goes like this:
>
> A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
> B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
> C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.
>
> I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
> guidelines.  Here's two that I have:
>
> 1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
> an existing commercial contract.
>
> This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
> commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
> service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead
of

> bspace.
>
> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?
>
> I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
> seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
> have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.
>
> --
> Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
> Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
> 164 Chavez Student Center
> 510-642-5123 office
> 925-285-1088 cell
> asc.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
means

> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
means

> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
means

> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> Ian Crew
>
> Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
>
> Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
>
> University of California, Berkeley
>
> 2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
>
> http://hub.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
> <winmail.dat>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.

Ian Crew
Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
University of California, Berkeley
2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
http://hub.berkeley.edu


 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
employers, and people who have known you in the past.


 
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The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:

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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Ian Crew
For what it's worth, I know there was some discussion during the development of the TechCommons that having some sort of "Good Housekeeping Seal" for certain, more officially vetted and approved, items listed there would be a good idea [1].  That idea didn't make the cut for version 1.0, but I still think it's a good idea.  If you agree, I'd encourage to let the TechCommons team know via their tc-support@lists address.

At this point, I think TechCommons is about the most comprehensive list out there [2], but more research would still be needed before making the decision to implement a particular tool.

Cheers,

Ian

Notes:

[1] - Maybe even a grading system would be of some use (this product is OK for most non-restricted data, this one is OK for FERPA data but not health data, etc.).  That'd be more work, but maybe more useful.

[2] - It's far from complete or perfect, but I don't know of a better one.  If we all pitch in, we can make it a lot closer to complete and perfect!

On Jan 25, 2012, at 3:19 PM, Noam Manor wrote:

> So the question remains: is there a way to find out about all of the online
> and IT services provided and approved by the campus.
> There have been a number of announcements recently about new agreements, but
> it would be helpful to know what else might be available.
>
> Noam
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 1:16 PM
> To: Satya Levine
> Cc: [hidden email]
> Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
> Hi Satya:
>
> The TechCommons is purely crowdsourced, so a listing there does not
> inherently confer any official approval. The fact that there's a listing
> only says that someone in our community took the time to enter that product
> into the system.  
>
> See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/faq for a bunch more FAQs about it.
> (But not that one.  I'd suggest you contact the TechCommons support team at
> [hidden email] and suggest that one--it's a good one.)
>
> And yes, the hope of the TechCommons is that it will be a source of tips,
> advice, best practices, etc.  That's the major reason we worked so hard to
> make it crowdsourced.  That way, if you enter a product, but I have a tip or
> a trick, or more details about it, I can go in and share those with the
> community.  (To re emphasize, you have to have a CalNet ID to create or edit
> anything there, and all changes are tracked, so it's a pretty safe and
> accountable place.)
>
> Cheers,
>
> Ian
>
> On Jan 25, 2012, at 1:05 PM, Satya Levine wrote:
>
>> Hi Ian,
>>
>>
>>
>> Does a listing on techcommons indicate that a product had been approved by
>> the university? Also, is the idea that techcommons may be a seed for an
>> internal campus social network for sharing tools, tips, soliciting advice,
>> etc.?
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Satya
>>
>>
>>
>> Satya Levine
>>
>> Communications Coordinator
>>
>> UC Berkeley Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
>>
>> 1925 Walnut St. #1570
>>
>> Berkeley, CA 94720-1570
>>
>> Tel: 510.642.5254
>>
>> Fax: 510.642.2202
>>
>> http://olli.berkeley.edu
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: [hidden email]
>> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Ian Crew
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 12:06 PM
>> To: Richard DeShong
>> Cc: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>>
>>
>>
>> That's the idea of that site, yes.  
>>
>>
>>
>> (Actually, non-university-provided stuff that's in use on campus should be
>> there too--the more we know and share about what we're all using, the
> easier
>> it'll be to make smart choices.)
>>
>>
>>
>> The cool thing about that site is that anyone with a CalNet ID can create
> a
>> new page, or provide a correction or update to an existing page.  Give it
> a
>> try!
>>
>>
>>
>> See http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/tech-commons for more details.
>>
>>
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian
>>
>> (Yet another disclaimer: I was involved with the creation of the
> TechCommons
>> site, but I'm not currently on that project....)
>>
>>
>>
>> On Jan 25, 2012, at 11:51 AM, Richard DeShong wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Maybe techcommons.berkeley.edu can be that list?
>> --
>> Richard DeShong
>>
>>
>> From: Noam Manor    Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:44 AM
>>
>> Thank you for starting this discussion, Richard. It has been on my mind as
>> well.
>>
>> Is there a comprehensive list somewhere of the different online services
>> that the University provides?
>>
>> For example, is there a service for collecting information using online
>> forms, like the ones available on Google Docs or wufoo.com?
>>
>> On a related note, once the migration to Google Apps for Education is
>> complete, will the services offered have different privacy agreements from
>> the equivalent free ones offered by Google?
>> Will Google Docs forms created with a Google Apps for Education account,
> for
>> instance, be appropriate for collecting FERPA protected information?
>>
>> Noam
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: [hidden email]
>> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
>> DeShong
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:17 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>>
>> Dear Micronet,
>> I have staff members who are interested in using various commercial
> services
>> to facilitate various parts of their job.  I think the main interest is
> that
>> the services seem to be "easy", "common", and "free".  The main decision
>> process goes like this:
>>
>> A) I'd like to be able to do "this".
>> B) Google "this" and find a company that offers it for free.
>> C) Create an account and start using it to see how it works.
>>
>> I'd like to make sure that the decision process includes appropriate
>> guidelines.  Here's two that I have:
>>
>> 1) Does the University provide a similar service - either inhouse, or with
>> an existing commercial contract.
>>
>> This may seem obvious, but I've fallen into the trap of using a free
>> commercial service, then later realized I could use a Univ. provided
>> service.  Currently, a staff member is wanting to use piazza.com, instead
> of
>> bspace.
>>
>> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
>> released to the public?
>>
>> I tried looking at ucop.edu/irc/policy, but couldn't find what I know I've
>> seen on this list before - policies regarding using services that do not
>> have the appropriate clauses in their policies to protect the university.
>>
>> --
>> Richard DeShong, Information Systems Analyst
>> Athletic Study Center, UC Berkeley
>> 164 Chavez Student Center
>> 510-642-5123 office
>> 925-285-1088 cell
>> asc.berkeley.edu
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means
>> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
>> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Crew
>>
>> Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
>>
>> Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
>>
>> University of California, Berkeley
>>
>> 2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
>>
>> http://hub.berkeley.edu
>>
>>
>>
>> <winmail.dat>
>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>
>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>
>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>
>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
> Ian Crew
> Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
> Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
> University of California, Berkeley
> 2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
> http://hub.berkeley.edu
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

Ian Crew
Platform and Services Manager, Research Hub
Information Services and Technology-Research and Content Technologies
University of California, Berkeley
2195 Hearst Ave, Second Floor
http://hub.berkeley.edu


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Richard DeShong-2
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
And to the other point of the original post (policy):

Example:  I pick a commercial service, create an account using my private
credentials, and use it to conduct University business.  Emails, texting,
chat, fileshare, etc.

I could then leave the University, delete my account, and the University
would, at best, just have the end result of my work, but no record of the
business details that I conducted using that account.

To address this concern:

1) When I have control over the use of a commercial service, I suggest that
we use a department email and a dept password to setup the account.  That
way, there's some sense of dept control.

--
Richard DeShong


From: Richard DeShong Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:48 AM

Certainly, on a legal level, it depends on the interpretation of the picture
that the information paints.  But this isn't just about what can ultimately
cause a guilty verdict.  It's more about the environment that the University
provides for our conversations.  The discussion between students, faculty,
and staff.

When a group of students, faculty, and staff are in a discussion related to
class, what expectations are there that the discussion is managed by the
University?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Greg Merritt Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:25 AM

Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?
-Greg

> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers gets
> released to the public?


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Greg Merritt
In reply to this post by Noam Manor
I usually start here:

http://ist.berkeley.edu/services

-Greg


On Jan 25, 2012, at 3:19 PM, Noam Manor wrote:

> So the question remains: is there a way to find out about all of the online
> and IT services provided and approved by the campus.
> There have been a number of announcements recently about new agreements, but
> it would be helpful to know what else might be available.
>
> Noam


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

David Alan WILLSON
In reply to this post by Richard DeShong-2
Colleagues,

Thank you to Richard for surfacing this important issue!  The emergence of
'cloud' services and a range of technologies that have enabled them offer a
tremendous amount of opportunity.  They also present a number of challenges,
as the procurement and management models that have worked well in the past
are not as good a fit for these emerging services.  Developing practical
approaches that enable  the community to take advantage of the opportunity
these services present is a high priority.  We expect that our strategies
will evolve over time, though in general the expectation is that we will
need to approach these engagements at the highest organizational level
possible.  In some cases this will look like a service broker arrangement
where campus demand is aggregated and offered to campus as a service such as
the Drupal webhosting service (e.g.
http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/ist-drupal-cloud-hosting-pantheon),
while in others we expect to partner above campus, as in the Box.net service
that was developed by and offered through Internet2
(http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Oct-Nov2011/Boxnet) or as the system did
recently in achieving Microsoft 365 terms and conditions, that was largely
the result of effective collaboration if like institutions partnering
through the Common Solutions Group (http://www.stonesoup.org/).

In reviewing the original and subsequent posts, it seems that there are
three broad questions that are being asked:

1. Having identified a service with attractive functionality, how do I
find out whether there are similar services available or in use on campus?

As has already been pretty well covered in earlier responses, the two best
sources for this are TechCommons (http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/) and the
IST Service catalog (http://ist.berkeley.edu/services).

2. Is the service I want to use approved by the campus?

There are really two questions here.  

The first is whether we have a contract in place with the supplier, or if
not can we get an acceptable contract in place?  A catalog of Campus
Agreements can be found at
(http://businessservices.berkeley.edu/procurement/sourcing/agreements),
while systemwide agreements can be found at
(http://www.ucop.edu/purchserv/access.php).  In the likely case that you
don't see a contract in place with the service provider you are looking for,
you are going to need to work with your local/departmental Purchasing
representative to see about getting an agreement in place for the service
you are interested in.  This can be a challenge, as most of these services
have standard terms and conditions that are not minimally acceptable to the
University.  The most common and most stringent roadblock is in regard to
3rd party indemnity provisions that are often in conflict with a Regential
Standing Order 100.4.dd.9
(http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/regents/bylaws/so1004.html).  What
makes this different from other contractual clauses and so difficult to
overcome is that it requires an act of the Regents to grant an exception.
This is combination with the general business model of most of these
services that drive toward providing standardized services at scale often
leave us in a situation where the supplier is unable or unwilling to
negotiate changes to their terms, particularly if we are talking about a low
dollar transaction where an hour or two of Legal time can eat up the profit
margin for many months of service delivery.


The second question is whether your intended use of the service is in
compliance with University policies.  The distinction here is that just
because there is a contract in place with a supplier doesn't mean that it is
appropriate for all use cases.  An example is our Google agreement which
will meet the overwhelming majority of our needs in the e-mail/calendar
space, but that is not HIPPA compliant and as such is not a good fit for use
cases where Protected Health Information is in play.

3. Who is responsible for my data?

By engaging with a service provider, you have the responsibility as the
Resource Proprietor for ensuring compliance with laws, regulations and
policies, including standards. (UC Business Finance Bulletin IS-2 and IS-3
http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/bfbis.html)

For example, if notice-triggering data is involved, the service (whether on
or off campus) must meet the protective measures defined in the campus
Minimum Security Standard for Electronic Information.
(https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/elecinfo.html)  Information that is
subject to state or federal regulations will have use and disclosure
restrictions that must be maintained.  Student records are protected by
FERPA regulations. (http://registrar.berkeley.edu/ferpa.html).  Medical
records are protected by HIPAA, FERPA, and state laws.

The Resource Proprietor, in consultation with the Resource Custodian, is
responsible for determining the level of risk (subject to  law, regulation
and policy) and ensuring implementation of appropriate security controls to
address that risk.

This puts responsibility for evaluation of the service's security controls
(e.g., hardening, patching and monitoring) in the hands of the Resource
Proprietor. Although not directly applicable to services outside of the
campus network, the campus Minimum Security Standard for Networked Devices
provides a useful set of baseline security requirements.
(https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/AppA.min.htm)

Recognizing that cloud-based services and their related ecosystems are
increasingly attractive offerings, guidance and requirements in the arena of
vendor evaluation and inventory and classification of University information
assets (all UC policy requirements) are under development.

For assistance with IT policy contact Lisa Ho, IT Policy Manager,
[hidden email].
For assistance with conducting the risk assessment contact Ann Geyer, CPSO,
[hidden email].

Enabling campus to take advantage of the opportunities that these services
present is a high priority and while we do not at present have as many good
answers as we would like to, we will continue to work toward that goal.  If
there are particular services or types of services that you believe would
add significant value, please contact me ([hidden email]) as it will
be helpful in prioritizing our work.

Regards,

David Willson, C.P.M., CFA
Manager, Strategic Technology Acquisition
Office of the Chief Information Officer
University of California, Berkeley
510-643-9677


-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 3:51 PM
To: 'Micronet Micronet'
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

And to the other point of the original post (policy):

Example:  I pick a commercial service, create an account using my private
credentials, and use it to conduct University business.  Emails, texting,
chat, fileshare, etc.

I could then leave the University, delete my account, and the University
would, at best, just have the end result of my work, but no record of the
business details that I conducted using that account.

To address this concern:

1) When I have control over the use of a commercial service, I suggest that
we use a department email and a dept password to setup the account.  That
way, there's some sense of dept control.

--
Richard DeShong


From: Richard DeShong Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:48 AM

Certainly, on a legal level, it depends on the interpretation of the picture
that the information paints.  But this isn't just about what can ultimately
cause a guilty verdict.  It's more about the environment that the University
provides for our conversations.  The discussion between students, faculty,
and staff.

When a group of students, faculty, and staff are in a discussion related to
class, what expectations are there that the discussion is managed by the
University?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Greg Merritt Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:25 AM

Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?
-Greg

> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers
> gets released to the public?


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Noam Manor
Thank you, David. This is very helpful.
I have a couple of questions about the following:

"An example is our Google agreement which will meet the overwhelming
majority of our needs in the e-mail/calendar space, but that is not HIPPA
compliant and as such is not a good fit for use cases where Protected Health
Information is in play."

You mention "the e-mail/calendar space." What about other Google features,
such as Google Docs? Will that feature, for example, be FERPA compliant?

Best,

Noam Manor
Fall Program for Freshmen
(510) 643-0388
[hidden email]


-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of David Willson
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2012 3:32 PM
To: 'Richard DeShong'; 'Micronet Micronet'
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Colleagues,

Thank you to Richard for surfacing this important issue!  The emergence of
'cloud' services and a range of technologies that have enabled them offer a
tremendous amount of opportunity.  They also present a number of challenges,
as the procurement and management models that have worked well in the past
are not as good a fit for these emerging services.  Developing practical
approaches that enable  the community to take advantage of the opportunity
these services present is a high priority.  We expect that our strategies
will evolve over time, though in general the expectation is that we will
need to approach these engagements at the highest organizational level
possible.  In some cases this will look like a service broker arrangement
where campus demand is aggregated and offered to campus as a service such as
the Drupal webhosting service (e.g.
http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/ist-drupal-cloud-hosting-pantheon),
while in others we expect to partner above campus, as in the Box.net service
that was developed by and offered through Internet2
(http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Oct-Nov2011/Boxnet) or as the system did
recently in achieving Microsoft 365 terms and conditions, that was largely
the result of effective collaboration if like institutions partnering
through the Common Solutions Group (http://www.stonesoup.org/).

In reviewing the original and subsequent posts, it seems that there are
three broad questions that are being asked:

1. Having identified a service with attractive functionality, how do I
find out whether there are similar services available or in use on campus?

As has already been pretty well covered in earlier responses, the two best
sources for this are TechCommons (http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/) and the
IST Service catalog (http://ist.berkeley.edu/services).

2. Is the service I want to use approved by the campus?

There are really two questions here.  

The first is whether we have a contract in place with the supplier, or if
not can we get an acceptable contract in place?  A catalog of Campus
Agreements can be found at
(http://businessservices.berkeley.edu/procurement/sourcing/agreements),
while systemwide agreements can be found at
(http://www.ucop.edu/purchserv/access.php).  In the likely case that you
don't see a contract in place with the service provider you are looking for,
you are going to need to work with your local/departmental Purchasing
representative to see about getting an agreement in place for the service
you are interested in.  This can be a challenge, as most of these services
have standard terms and conditions that are not minimally acceptable to the
University.  The most common and most stringent roadblock is in regard to
3rd party indemnity provisions that are often in conflict with a Regential
Standing Order 100.4.dd.9
(http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/regents/bylaws/so1004.html).  What
makes this different from other contractual clauses and so difficult to
overcome is that it requires an act of the Regents to grant an exception.
This is combination with the general business model of most of these
services that drive toward providing standardized services at scale often
leave us in a situation where the supplier is unable or unwilling to
negotiate changes to their terms, particularly if we are talking about a low
dollar transaction where an hour or two of Legal time can eat up the profit
margin for many months of service delivery.


The second question is whether your intended use of the service is in
compliance with University policies.  The distinction here is that just
because there is a contract in place with a supplier doesn't mean that it is
appropriate for all use cases.  An example is our Google agreement which
will meet the overwhelming majority of our needs in the e-mail/calendar
space, but that is not HIPPA compliant and as such is not a good fit for use
cases where Protected Health Information is in play.

3. Who is responsible for my data?

By engaging with a service provider, you have the responsibility as the
Resource Proprietor for ensuring compliance with laws, regulations and
policies, including standards. (UC Business Finance Bulletin IS-2 and IS-3
http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/bfbis.html)

For example, if notice-triggering data is involved, the service (whether on
or off campus) must meet the protective measures defined in the campus
Minimum Security Standard for Electronic Information.
(https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/elecinfo.html)  Information that is
subject to state or federal regulations will have use and disclosure
restrictions that must be maintained.  Student records are protected by
FERPA regulations. (http://registrar.berkeley.edu/ferpa.html).  Medical
records are protected by HIPAA, FERPA, and state laws.

The Resource Proprietor, in consultation with the Resource Custodian, is
responsible for determining the level of risk (subject to  law, regulation
and policy) and ensuring implementation of appropriate security controls to
address that risk.

This puts responsibility for evaluation of the service's security controls
(e.g., hardening, patching and monitoring) in the hands of the Resource
Proprietor. Although not directly applicable to services outside of the
campus network, the campus Minimum Security Standard for Networked Devices
provides a useful set of baseline security requirements.
(https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/AppA.min.htm)

Recognizing that cloud-based services and their related ecosystems are
increasingly attractive offerings, guidance and requirements in the arena of
vendor evaluation and inventory and classification of University information
assets (all UC policy requirements) are under development.

For assistance with IT policy contact Lisa Ho, IT Policy Manager,
[hidden email].
For assistance with conducting the risk assessment contact Ann Geyer, CPSO,
[hidden email].

Enabling campus to take advantage of the opportunities that these services
present is a high priority and while we do not at present have as many good
answers as we would like to, we will continue to work toward that goal.  If
there are particular services or types of services that you believe would
add significant value, please contact me ([hidden email]) as it will
be helpful in prioritizing our work.

Regards,

David Willson, C.P.M., CFA
Manager, Strategic Technology Acquisition
Office of the Chief Information Officer
University of California, Berkeley
510-643-9677


-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
DeShong
Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 3:51 PM
To: 'Micronet Micronet'
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

And to the other point of the original post (policy):

Example:  I pick a commercial service, create an account using my private
credentials, and use it to conduct University business.  Emails, texting,
chat, fileshare, etc.

I could then leave the University, delete my account, and the University
would, at best, just have the end result of my work, but no record of the
business details that I conducted using that account.

To address this concern:

1) When I have control over the use of a commercial service, I suggest that
we use a department email and a dept password to setup the account.  That
way, there's some sense of dept control.

--
Richard DeShong


From: Richard DeShong Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:48 AM

Certainly, on a legal level, it depends on the interpretation of the picture
that the information paints.  But this isn't just about what can ultimately
cause a guilty verdict.  It's more about the environment that the University
provides for our conversations.  The discussion between students, faculty,
and staff.

When a group of students, faculty, and staff are in a discussion related to
class, what expectations are there that the discussion is managed by the
University?
--
Richard DeShong


From: Greg Merritt Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:25 AM

Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?
-Greg

> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers
> gets released to the public?


 
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Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies

Christopher Brooks
In reply to this post by David Alan WILLSON
David,

Thanks for the detailed reply.

Is OE addressing the Regents/Indemnity issue?  Otherwise we seem to be
stuck reinventing the wheel instead of using common off the shelf
technology.  Solving the Regents/Indemnity issue would have very high
leverage.  Negotiating a campus-wide or system-wide agreement for common
resources is good, but making it easier for individuals to properly
reach agreements for uncommon resources is important.

I've found negotiating a software license to be very time consuming, I
allocate 6-12 months of calendar time to tasks like this.

For OE to succeed, there must be changes throughout the organization,
including changes in how we operate at the Regents level.

Do other universities have similar indemnity clauses?

_Christopher

On 1/30/12 3:31 PM, David Willson wrote:

> Colleagues,
>
> Thank you to Richard for surfacing this important issue!  The emergence of
> 'cloud' services and a range of technologies that have enabled them offer a
> tremendous amount of opportunity.  They also present a number of challenges,
> as the procurement and management models that have worked well in the past
> are not as good a fit for these emerging services.  Developing practical
> approaches that enable  the community to take advantage of the opportunity
> these services present is a high priority.  We expect that our strategies
> will evolve over time, though in general the expectation is that we will
> need to approach these engagements at the highest organizational level
> possible.  In some cases this will look like a service broker arrangement
> where campus demand is aggregated and offered to campus as a service such as
> the Drupal webhosting service (e.g.
> http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/product/ist-drupal-cloud-hosting-pantheon),
> while in others we expect to partner above campus, as in the Box.net service
> that was developed by and offered through Internet2
> (http://inews.berkeley.edu/articles/Oct-Nov2011/Boxnet) or as the system did
> recently in achieving Microsoft 365 terms and conditions, that was largely
> the result of effective collaboration if like institutions partnering
> through the Common Solutions Group (http://www.stonesoup.org/).
>
> In reviewing the original and subsequent posts, it seems that there are
> three broad questions that are being asked:
>
> 1. Having identified a service with attractive functionality, how do I
> find out whether there are similar services available or in use on campus?
>
> As has already been pretty well covered in earlier responses, the two best
> sources for this are TechCommons (http://techcommons.berkeley.edu/) and the
> IST Service catalog (http://ist.berkeley.edu/services).
>
> 2. Is the service I want to use approved by the campus?
>
> There are really two questions here.
>
> The first is whether we have a contract in place with the supplier, or if
> not can we get an acceptable contract in place?  A catalog of Campus
> Agreements can be found at
> (http://businessservices.berkeley.edu/procurement/sourcing/agreements),
> while systemwide agreements can be found at
> (http://www.ucop.edu/purchserv/access.php).  In the likely case that you
> don't see a contract in place with the service provider you are looking for,
> you are going to need to work with your local/departmental Purchasing
> representative to see about getting an agreement in place for the service
> you are interested in.  This can be a challenge, as most of these services
> have standard terms and conditions that are not minimally acceptable to the
> University.  The most common and most stringent roadblock is in regard to
> 3rd party indemnity provisions that are often in conflict with a Regential
> Standing Order 100.4.dd.9
> (http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/regents/bylaws/so1004.html).  What
> makes this different from other contractual clauses and so difficult to
> overcome is that it requires an act of the Regents to grant an exception.
> This is combination with the general business model of most of these
> services that drive toward providing standardized services at scale often
> leave us in a situation where the supplier is unable or unwilling to
> negotiate changes to their terms, particularly if we are talking about a low
> dollar transaction where an hour or two of Legal time can eat up the profit
> margin for many months of service delivery.
>
>
> The second question is whether your intended use of the service is in
> compliance with University policies.  The distinction here is that just
> because there is a contract in place with a supplier doesn't mean that it is
> appropriate for all use cases.  An example is our Google agreement which
> will meet the overwhelming majority of our needs in the e-mail/calendar
> space, but that is not HIPPA compliant and as such is not a good fit for use
> cases where Protected Health Information is in play.
>
> 3. Who is responsible for my data?
>
> By engaging with a service provider, you have the responsibility as the
> Resource Proprietor for ensuring compliance with laws, regulations and
> policies, including standards. (UC Business Finance Bulletin IS-2 and IS-3
> http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/bfbis.html)
>
> For example, if notice-triggering data is involved, the service (whether on
> or off campus) must meet the protective measures defined in the campus
> Minimum Security Standard for Electronic Information.
> (https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/elecinfo.html)  Information that is
> subject to state or federal regulations will have use and disclosure
> restrictions that must be maintained.  Student records are protected by
> FERPA regulations. (http://registrar.berkeley.edu/ferpa.html).  Medical
> records are protected by HIPAA, FERPA, and state laws.
>
> The Resource Proprietor, in consultation with the Resource Custodian, is
> responsible for determining the level of risk (subject to  law, regulation
> and policy) and ensuring implementation of appropriate security controls to
> address that risk.
>
> This puts responsibility for evaluation of the service's security controls
> (e.g., hardening, patching and monitoring) in the hands of the Resource
> Proprietor. Although not directly applicable to services outside of the
> campus network, the campus Minimum Security Standard for Networked Devices
> provides a useful set of baseline security requirements.
> (https://security.berkeley.edu/MinStds/AppA.min.htm)
>
> Recognizing that cloud-based services and their related ecosystems are
> increasingly attractive offerings, guidance and requirements in the arena of
> vendor evaluation and inventory and classification of University information
> assets (all UC policy requirements) are under development.
>
> For assistance with IT policy contact Lisa Ho, IT Policy Manager,
> [hidden email].
> For assistance with conducting the risk assessment contact Ann Geyer, CPSO,
> [hidden email].
>
> Enabling campus to take advantage of the opportunities that these services
> present is a high priority and while we do not at present have as many good
> answers as we would like to, we will continue to work toward that goal.  If
> there are particular services or types of services that you believe would
> add significant value, please contact me ([hidden email]) as it will
> be helpful in prioritizing our work.
>
> Regards,
>
> David Willson, C.P.M., CFA
> Manager, Strategic Technology Acquisition
> Office of the Chief Information Officer
> University of California, Berkeley
> 510-643-9677
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: [hidden email]
> [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Richard
> DeShong
> Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 3:51 PM
> To: 'Micronet Micronet'
> Subject: Re: [Micronet] Use of Commercial Services, policies
>
> And to the other point of the original post (policy):
>
> Example:  I pick a commercial service, create an account using my private
> credentials, and use it to conduct University business.  Emails, texting,
> chat, fileshare, etc.
>
> I could then leave the University, delete my account, and the University
> would, at best, just have the end result of my work, but no record of the
> business details that I conducted using that account.
>
> To address this concern:
>
> 1) When I have control over the use of a commercial service, I suggest that
> we use a department email and a dept password to setup the account.  That
> way, there's some sense of dept control.
>
> --
> Richard DeShong
>
>
> From: Richard DeShong Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:48 AM
>
> Certainly, on a legal level, it depends on the interpretation of the picture
> that the information paints.  But this isn't just about what can ultimately
> cause a guilty verdict.  It's more about the environment that the University
> provides for our conversations.  The discussion between students, faculty,
> and staff.
>
> When a group of students, faculty, and staff are in a discussion related to
> class, what expectations are there that the discussion is managed by the
> University?
> --
> Richard DeShong
>
>
> From: Greg Merritt Sent: Wednesday, January 25, 2012 11:25 AM
>
> Won't that depend an awful lot on the information itself?
> -Greg
>
>> 2) What happens if the information stored on the commercial servers
>> gets released to the public?
>
>
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> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
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> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
> these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective
> employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>
>
>
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> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

--
Christopher Brooks, PMP                       University of California
CHESS Executive Director                      US Mail: 337 Cory Hall
Programmer/Analyst CHESS/Ptolemy/Trust        Berkeley, CA 94720-1774
ph: 510.643.9841                                (Office: 545Q Cory)
home: (F-Tu) 707.665.0131 cell: 707.332.0670


 
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