[Micronet] Wake on WAN

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[Micronet] Wake on WAN

Tom Salinaro
Hello.
I would like to start hibernating my work computer but still be able to access it from home.
I am able to wake it up from other computers on the LAN but I am unable to do so with one of the free utilities on the internet like:
http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx
http://wol.dtools.net/
There are a few others that I've tried as well.
I assume the campus firewall is blocking the traffic. Would I be right about that?
Has anyone else come up with a solution?

I also tried to use sleep mode but I can't get the thing to wake up remotely even though I disabled the power management setting for the nic (Broadcom netextreme 57xx running on Win7). I would prefer to get hibernate to work, but I'll take what I can get at this point. 
Thanks.
--

Tom Salinaro
IT Manager / Receptionist
UC Berkeley
Physical Education Dept.
200 Hearst Gym

Please consider printing this email twice and storing one copy off-site.


 
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michael Sinatra-2
On 6/30/10 8:30 AM, Tom Salinaro wrote:

> Hello.
> I would like to start hibernating my work computer but still be able to
> access it from home.
> I am able to wake it up from other computers on the LAN but I am unable
> to do so with one of the free utilities on the internet like:
> http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx
> http://wol.dtools.net/
> There are a few others that I've tried as well.
> I assume the campus firewall is blocking the traffic. Would I be right
> about that?

The nonexistent campus firewall isn't blocking the traffic.  First off,
Wake on LAN requires a "magic" broadcast packet to be sent.  That packet
identifies the machine and tells its NIC to wake up the machine.  Wake
on WAN (i.e. wake on LAN over the "Internet") therefore requires that
subnet directed broadcast be enabled.  Routers (including the campus
routers) can be configured to accept unicast packets sent to the
directed broadcast address for the subnet and the router then converts
them to broadcast packets and forwards them on.  With directed broadcast
enabled, anyone on the Internet can send broadcast packets to a given
subnet.

This is what's known as a "security worst practice" and most routers
(including campus routers) no longer enable it by default.  In fact,
"IST Staff" disabled it on campus in 1998.  Here's an exciting thread
from USENET which includes the original announcement by Chris van den
Berg, as well as replies from the legendary psb and a clueless (and
possibly intoxicated at the time) campus IT administrator for the
College of Chemistry who shall remain nameless until you see the email
address of said person.

http://groups.google.com/group/ucb.sysadmin/browse_thread/thread/ce0a418706dcb5f1/4540c9a9f2ca5b4e?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8

While I don't like security practices that significantly limit
functionality with little risk mitigation, directed broadcast opens up
several cans of risky worms that probably override any functionality
provided by wake on WAN.  It's actually not clear that it would function
properly any more anyway, since few, if any, networks enable it.

michael

 
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Kevin D. Burney
The IST Verdiem Surveyor Solution can be used to wake machines remotely.  It uses the magic packet via a proxy machine on each segment so that the routers do not need to have the subnet broadcast enabled.  

It is not very helpful if there is only one machine on the subnet to turn on as the proxy machine needs to be powered on to echo the magic packet on the subnet.

-Kevin

________________________________________
From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] on behalf of Michael Sinatra [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:58 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

On 6/30/10 8:30 AM, Tom Salinaro wrote:

> Hello.
> I would like to start hibernating my work computer but still be able to
> access it from home.
> I am able to wake it up from other computers on the LAN but I am unable
> to do so with one of the free utilities on the internet like:
> http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx
> http://wol.dtools.net/
> There are a few others that I've tried as well.
> I assume the campus firewall is blocking the traffic. Would I be right
> about that?

The nonexistent campus firewall isn't blocking the traffic.  First off,
Wake on LAN requires a "magic" broadcast packet to be sent.  That packet
identifies the machine and tells its NIC to wake up the machine.  Wake
on WAN (i.e. wake on LAN over the "Internet") therefore requires that
subnet directed broadcast be enabled.  Routers (including the campus
routers) can be configured to accept unicast packets sent to the
directed broadcast address for the subnet and the router then converts
them to broadcast packets and forwards them on.  With directed broadcast
enabled, anyone on the Internet can send broadcast packets to a given
subnet.

This is what's known as a "security worst practice" and most routers
(including campus routers) no longer enable it by default.  In fact,
"IST Staff" disabled it on campus in 1998.  Here's an exciting thread
from USENET which includes the original announcement by Chris van den
Berg, as well as replies from the legendary psb and a clueless (and
possibly intoxicated at the time) campus IT administrator for the
College of Chemistry who shall remain nameless until you see the email
address of said person.

http://groups.google.com/group/ucb.sysadmin/browse_thread/thread/ce0a418706dcb5f1/4540c9a9f2ca5b4e?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8

While I don't like security practices that significantly limit
functionality with little risk mitigation, directed broadcast opens up
several cans of risky worms that probably override any functionality
provided by wake on WAN.  It's actually not clear that it would function
properly any more anyway, since few, if any, networks enable it.

michael


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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michael C. Nicol
In reply to this post by Michael Sinatra-2
Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?

  Michael C. Nicol
 Systems Administrator III, MCSE
 (510)585-1575
 




-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Michael
Sinatra
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 11:58 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

On 6/30/10 8:30 AM, Tom Salinaro wrote:

> Hello.
> I would like to start hibernating my work computer but still be able
> to access it from home.
> I am able to wake it up from other computers on the LAN but I am
> unable to do so with one of the free utilities on the internet like:
> http://www.depicus.com/wake-on-lan/woli.aspx
> http://wol.dtools.net/
> There are a few others that I've tried as well.
> I assume the campus firewall is blocking the traffic. Would I be right
> about that?

The nonexistent campus firewall isn't blocking the traffic.  First off, Wake
on LAN requires a "magic" broadcast packet to be sent.  That packet
identifies the machine and tells its NIC to wake up the machine.  Wake on
WAN (i.e. wake on LAN over the "Internet") therefore requires that subnet
directed broadcast be enabled.  Routers (including the campus
routers) can be configured to accept unicast packets sent to the directed
broadcast address for the subnet and the router then converts them to
broadcast packets and forwards them on.  With directed broadcast enabled,
anyone on the Internet can send broadcast packets to a given subnet.

This is what's known as a "security worst practice" and most routers
(including campus routers) no longer enable it by default.  In fact, "IST
Staff" disabled it on campus in 1998.  Here's an exciting thread from USENET
which includes the original announcement by Chris van den Berg, as well as
replies from the legendary psb and a clueless (and possibly intoxicated at
the time) campus IT administrator for the College of Chemistry who shall
remain nameless until you see the email address of said person.

http://groups.google.com/group/ucb.sysadmin/browse_thread/thread/ce0a418706d
cb5f1/4540c9a9f2ca5b4e?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8

While I don't like security practices that significantly limit functionality
with little risk mitigation, directed broadcast opens up several cans of
risky worms that probably override any functionality provided by wake on
WAN.  It's actually not clear that it would function properly any more
anyway, since few, if any, networks enable it.

michael

 
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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Greg Merritt
> Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?



Well, we're "licensed to Google" so I found this:

http://cio.berkeley.edu/workfromhome/

"If you are participating in one of the pilot groups on campus running  
Verdiem and using Wake on Web, you do not need to leave your computer  
on. Instead, you would go to the Wake on Webwebsite to wake your  
computer before remotely connecting to it."

http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/
http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/_instructions/howto.htm

Interesting!  Maybe somebody administering or participating in the  
program can tell us more here on Micronet?

-Greg

 
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michelle Bautista
Hi Greg,

Wake on Web is a component of the Verdiem power management software.  COIS and IST/DOCS have been running this pilot for the past year.

Verdiem allows for centralized control and configuration of power management settings on Windows machines.  Wake on Web works with Verdiem.  A user can go to the website, search for their computer name and send a wake request to their computer.  This request goes to the Verdiem server which notifies a designated computer on the same subnet to wake the desired computer.  Verdiem will make 3 attempts to wake the computer from sleep.

Once awake, previously set power management settings take effect, typically sleeping the computer after 1 hr idle time.

We do not have a campus license for Verdiem at this time although there is a special pricing for the software available to us.  

-Michelle

Michelle Bautista
Supervisor
510-295-9283
Departmental Onsite Computing Support (DOCS)
IST Client Services



From: Greg Merritt <[hidden email]>
Date: June 30, 2010 1:07:40 PM PDT
To: Micronet user group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?



Well, we're "licensed to Google" so I found this:

http://cio.berkeley.edu/workfromhome/

"If you are participating in one of the pilot groups on campus running  
Verdiem and using Wake on Web, you do not need to leave your computer  
on. Instead, you would go to the Wake on Webwebsite to wake your  
computer before remotely connecting to it."

http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/
http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/_instructions/howto.htm

Interesting!  Maybe somebody administering or participating in the  
program can tell us more here on Micronet?

-Greg


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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.








 
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Greg Merritt *
In reply to this post by Kevin D. Burney
Ahhhh the missing piece. :)

Still pretty groovy, though!

-Greg


On Jun 30, 2010, at 12:02 PM, Kevin D. Burney wrote:

> The IST Verdiem Surveyor Solution can be used to wake machines  
> remotely.  It uses the magic packet via a proxy machine on each  
> segment so that the routers do not need to have the subnet broadcast  
> enabled.
>
> It is not very helpful if there is only one machine on the subnet to  
> turn on as the proxy machine needs to be powered on to echo the  
> magic packet on the subnet.
>
> -Kevin


 
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michael C. Nicol
In reply to this post by Tom Salinaro

We have it deployed across multiple departments and it works great.

 

Users need to pass calnet credentials to wake a machine and it only takes a few extra clicks…

 

Works with DDNS too…

 

Kevin,

 

Isn’t there a fairly robust reporting module too, so the power-savings can be calculated\tracked?

 

 

  [hidden email]
Systems Administrator III, MCSE
(510)585-1575
 

 

 

 

From: [hidden email] [mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Michelle Bautista
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 2:55 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

 

Hi Greg,

 

Wake on Web is a component of the Verdiem power management software.  COIS and IST/DOCS have been running this pilot for the past year.

 

Verdiem allows for centralized control and configuration of power management settings on Windows machines.  Wake on Web works with Verdiem.  A user can go to the website, search for their computer name and send a wake request to their computer.  This request goes to the Verdiem server which notifies a designated computer on the same subnet to wake the desired computer.  Verdiem will make 3 attempts to wake the computer from sleep.

 

Once awake, previously set power management settings take effect, typically sleeping the computer after 1 hr idle time.

 

We do not have a campus license for Verdiem at this time although there is a special pricing for the software available to us.  

 

-Michelle

 

Michelle Bautista

Supervisor

510-295-9283

Departmental Onsite Computing Support (DOCS)

IST Client Services

 

 

From: Greg Merritt <[hidden email]>
Date: June 30, 2010 1:07:40 PM PDT
To: Micronet user group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?




Well, we're "licensed to Google" so I found this:

http://cio.berkeley.edu/workfromhome/

"If you are participating in one of the pilot groups on campus running  
Verdiem and using Wake on Web, you do not need to leave your computer  
on. Instead, you would go to the Wake on Webwebsite to wake your  
computer before remotely connecting to it."

http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/
http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/_instructions/howto.htm

Interesting!  Maybe somebody administering or participating in the  
program can tell us more here on Micronet?

-Greg


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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michelle Bautista
In reply to this post by Tom Salinaro
Yes, Verdict can generate reports on energy usage and savings.

Michelle

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone

----- Reply message -----
From: "Michael C. Nicol" <[hidden email]>
Date: Wed, Jun 30, 2010 3:35 pm
Subject: [Micronet] Wake on WAN
To: "'Michelle Bautista'" <[hidden email]>, <[hidden email]>

We have it deployed across multiple departments and it works great.



Users need to pass calnet credentials to wake a machine and it only takes a
few extra clicks.



Works with DDNS too.



Kevin,



Isn't there a fairly robust reporting module too, so the power-savings can
be calculated\tracked?





  <mailto:[hidden email]> Michael C. Nicol
Systems Administrator III, MCSE
(510)585-1575
 <http://cois.berkeley.edu/>







From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Michelle
Bautista
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 2:55 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN



Hi Greg,



Wake on Web is a component of the Verdiem power management software.  COIS
and IST/DOCS have been running this pilot for the past year.



Verdiem allows for centralized control and configuration of power management
settings on Windows machines.  Wake on Web works with Verdiem.  A user can
go to the website, search for their computer name and send a wake request to
their computer.  This request goes to the Verdiem server which notifies a
designated computer on the same subnet to wake the desired computer.
Verdiem will make 3 attempts to wake the computer from sleep.



Once awake, previously set power management settings take effect, typically
sleeping the computer after 1 hr idle time.



We do not have a campus license for Verdiem at this time although there is a
special pricing for the software available to us.  



-Michelle



Michelle Bautista

Supervisor

510-295-9283

<mailto:[hidden email]> [hidden email]

Departmental Onsite Computing Support (DOCS)

IST Client Services

<http://docs.berkeley.edu> http://docs.berkeley.edu





From: Greg Merritt <[hidden email]>
Date: June 30, 2010 1:07:40 PM PDT
To: Micronet user group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?




Well, we're "licensed to Google" so I found this:

http://cio.berkeley.edu/workfromhome/

"If you are participating in one of the pilot groups on campus running  
Verdiem and using Wake on Web, you do not need to leave your computer  
on. Instead, you would go to the Wake on Webwebsite to wake your  
computer before remotely connecting to it."

http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/
http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/_instructions/howto.htm

Interesting!  Maybe somebody administering or participating in the  
program can tell us more here on Micronet?

-Greg


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Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means
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Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Michelle Bautista
In reply to this post by Tom Salinaro
Yes, Verdict can generate reports on energy usage and savings.

Michelle

Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone

----- Reply message -----
From: "Michael C. Nicol" <[hidden email]>
Date: Wed, Jun 30, 2010 3:35 pm
Subject: [Micronet] Wake on WAN
To: "'Michelle Bautista'" <[hidden email]>, <[hidden email]>

We have it deployed across multiple departments and it works great.



Users need to pass calnet credentials to wake a machine and it only takes a
few extra clicks.



Works with DDNS too.



Kevin,



Isn't there a fairly robust reporting module too, so the power-savings can
be calculated\tracked?





  <mailto:[hidden email]> Michael C. Nicol
Systems Administrator III, MCSE
(510)585-1575
 <http://cois.berkeley.edu/>







From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Michelle
Bautista
Sent: Wednesday, June 30, 2010 2:55 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN



Hi Greg,



Wake on Web is a component of the Verdiem power management software.  COIS
and IST/DOCS have been running this pilot for the past year.



Verdiem allows for centralized control and configuration of power management
settings on Windows machines.  Wake on Web works with Verdiem.  A user can
go to the website, search for their computer name and send a wake request to
their computer.  This request goes to the Verdiem server which notifies a
designated computer on the same subnet to wake the desired computer.
Verdiem will make 3 attempts to wake the computer from sleep.



Once awake, previously set power management settings take effect, typically
sleeping the computer after 1 hr idle time.



We do not have a campus license for Verdiem at this time although there is a
special pricing for the software available to us.  



-Michelle



Michelle Bautista

Supervisor

510-295-9283

<mailto:[hidden email]> [hidden email]

Departmental Onsite Computing Support (DOCS)

IST Client Services

<http://docs.berkeley.edu> http://docs.berkeley.edu





From: Greg Merritt <[hidden email]>
Date: June 30, 2010 1:07:40 PM PDT
To: Micronet user group <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [Micronet] Wake on WAN

Isn't there a campus license for verdiem?




Well, we're "licensed to Google" so I found this:

http://cio.berkeley.edu/workfromhome/

"If you are participating in one of the pilot groups on campus running  
Verdiem and using Wake on Web, you do not need to leave your computer  
on. Instead, you would go to the Wake on Webwebsite to wake your  
computer before remotely connecting to it."

http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/
http://wakeonweb.berkeley.edu/_instructions/howto.htm

Interesting!  Maybe somebody administering or participating in the  
program can tell us more here on Micronet?

-Greg


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