[Micronet] Why a preferred Windows 7 version? This is one reason...

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[Micronet] Why a preferred Windows 7 version? This is one reason...

Bruce Satow
One of the technical reasons why I prefer using Windows 7 Professional and above (32 bit or 64 bit) is that the lower versions such as the home editions do NOT have Remote Desktop server services.

That means with a home edition version of Windows 7 you can NOT remote desktop into it remotely.  Yes you can remote desktop out.

If you deploy such a machine you either have to install another remote desktop type client (e.g. VNC etc.) OR walk over there physically.   

If you have a small IT support department handling hundreds of computers, having the native remote desktop accessibility is important for efficient service and security.



--
Bruce Satow
University of California at Berkeley
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, California 94720-7450
[hidden email]
(510) 643-2348

A crash reduces
Your expensive computer
To a simple stone.


 
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Re: [Micronet] Why a preferred Windows 7 version? This is one reason...

Jonathan Felder-2
Remote desktop, XP mode, domain join, and group policy are big ones.
Presentation mode for laptops is also handy.

On 3/1/12 2:31 PM, Bruce Satow wrote:

> One of the technical reasons why I prefer using Windows 7 Professional
> and above (32 bit or 64 bit) is that the lower versions such as the home
> editions do NOT have Remote Desktop server services.
>
> That means with a home edition version of Windows 7 you can NOT remote
> desktop into it remotely. Yes you can remote desktop out.
>
> If you deploy such a machine you either have to install another remote
> desktop type client (e.g. VNC etc.) OR walk over there physically.
>
> If you have a small IT support department handling hundreds of
> computers, having the native remote desktop accessibility is important
> for efficient service and security.
>
>
>
> --
> *Bruce Satow*
> University of California at Berkeley
> Space Sciences Laboratory
> 7 Gauss Way
> Berkeley, California 94720-7450
> [hidden email] <mailto:[hidden email]>
> (510) 643-2348
>
> /A crash reduces
> Your expensive computer
> To a simple stone.
> /
>
>
>
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.

 
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To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:

http://micronet.berkeley.edu

Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.