[Micronet] Windows updates gone haywire

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[Micronet] Windows updates gone haywire

Adam Cohen
I've got a new Windows 7 system that  is having some problems with Windows Update.  One particular update keeps showing up despite the previous installation appearing to complete successfully.   Microsoft had us go through a procedure to reset WUS by stopping the service and deleting the Software Distribution folder.  That worked once, but now the problem has returned.    At first I suspected this was a problem with how they packaged and delivered the patch but it's only affecting one system that I know of right now.

Any thoughts?

A related question is whether a computer joined to the CAMPUS domain gets configured such that Windows Updates come from a campus update server rather than direct from Microsoft?

thanks
Adam
-- 
Adam Cohen / IT Manager
Energy Biosciences Institute / UC Berkeley
109 Calvin Lab / 510-642-7709


 
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Re: [Micronet] Windows updates gone haywire

Graham Patterson
There's a lot of this going on. For example:
http://isc.sans.edu/diary.html?storyid=10453#comment

Joining AD will not automatically do anything about your update source
unless you have a GPO configured for your OU.

Graham

On 2/24/2011 3:09 PM, Adam Cohen wrote:

> I've got a new Windows 7 system that  is having some problems with Windows Update.  One particular update keeps showing up despite the previous installation appearing to complete successfully.   Microsoft had us go through a procedure to reset WUS by stopping the service and deleting the Software Distribution folder.  That worked once, but now the problem has returned.    At first I suspected this was a problem with how they packaged and delivered the patch but it's only affecting one system that I know of right now.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> A related question is whether a computer joined to the CAMPUS domain gets configured such that Windows Updates come from a campus update server rather than direct from Microsoft?
>
> thanks
> Adam
>
>
>
>  
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses, prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.


--
Graham Patterson, Systems Administrator
Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley 510-643-2222

 
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