Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

justin.sullivan
Greg:

The Apple program provides price discounts of $50-$100 per machine with
the current average discount greater than 5%. In addition there are
discounts currently available on 10 packs of iPads.

It is important to note the following:

1. At UCB, discounted Apple pricing is only available through the BearBuy
punchout site, and is not available through any other on-line store or to
the public. Bundles can be accessed by clicking the Apple logo in BearBuy
and the recommended systems button in the upper right hand corner of the
screen. Since BearBuy is not fully available on campus, IST can assist
with ordering these bundles.

2. Pricing for all UCB bundles include automatic enrollment in AppleCare
for 3 years.

3. The UCB bundles are customized the default model you will find just by
selecting the product on the Apple educational site. For example, the UCB
13.3" MacBook Pro includes a 128GB SSD, while the default model while the
default model offered on the site at the includes a standard hard drive.
We are developing a table that shows differences between the UCB bundle
and the standard model for posting.

As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.

Best,
Justin


Justin Sullivan
Director – Strategic Sourcing
[hidden email] / [hidden email]
Phone: 415.815.7807





-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Greg
Merritt
Sent: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 6:24 PM
To: Micronet-UCB microcomputer support user group
Subject: Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative
Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

...and, at first look, the Macs look like they match the standard
educational discount, with no additional price break.

Is the savings in the simplification of the ordering process?  (I'm not
trivializing -- I'm serious.)

-Greg

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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

Tom Holub
On 2/29/12 8:02 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>
> 2. Pricing for all UCB bundles include automatic enrollment in AppleCare
> for 3 years.

Is that really wise?  It seems unlikely that it makes financial sense to
spend $183 for two years of depot coverage on an $1100 system.  If our
failure rate in years 2+3 is less than one in six (which seems likely),
we'd be better off buying 15% more laptops, putting them in storage and
using them to replace the ones that break.

The AppleCare Parts Agreement has more reasonable pricing than the full
AppleCare package; access to APA would be a potential benefit of a
program like this.

> As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
> frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.

What will the process be for deciding what the campus needs are?  My
group brought up a number of concerns during the initial configuration
phase of this project, and it doesn't appear that our concerns have been
reflected in the recommended configurations.

Those concerns include:

* Windows Home.  Yes, we have licensing for workable versions, but many
computers are bought without IT's knowledge, and many departments do not
have fully functional system imaging programs.  Manually reinstalling
Windows is very expensive, and this configuration option will result in
dozens or hundreds of manual Windows reinstalls.

* 250MB hard disk on a desktop.  Upgrading the configuration to
something more reasonable would be very inexpensive; why limit it
unnecessarily?

--
Tom Holub ([hidden email], 510-642-9069)
Director of Computing, College of Letters & Science
101.D Durant Hall
<http://LSCR.berkeley.edu/>

 
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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

Johnathon P. Kogelman
We purchase AppleCare on all Apple systems anyway; we don't have the
staffing nor time to try to sort out which computers are or are not
covered under extended warranty.

The concern I have is the default Windows (aka Dell) pricing, which is
high compared to the Dell's small business store or Lenovo desktop
computers. A perfect example would be the Lenovo M71 SFF desktop we order
now costs $680.00; similar spec & warranty except we use the i3 processor.

While I understand most savings will probably come from the streamlined
ordering, less administrative time purchasing computers, etc. One would
think the combined purchasing power from UCB & UCSF could of forced Dell
into much better deals per unit.

> On 2/29/12 8:02 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
>>
>> 2. Pricing for all UCB bundles include automatic enrollment in AppleCare
>> for 3 years.
>
> Is that really wise?  It seems unlikely that it makes financial sense to
> spend $183 for two years of depot coverage on an $1100 system.  If our
> failure rate in years 2+3 is less than one in six (which seems likely),
> we'd be better off buying 15% more laptops, putting them in storage and
> using them to replace the ones that break.
>
> The AppleCare Parts Agreement has more reasonable pricing than the full
> AppleCare package; access to APA would be a potential benefit of a
> program like this.
>
>> As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
>> frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.
>
> What will the process be for deciding what the campus needs are?  My
> group brought up a number of concerns during the initial configuration
> phase of this project, and it doesn't appear that our concerns have been
> reflected in the recommended configurations.
>
> Those concerns include:
>
> * Windows Home.  Yes, we have licensing for workable versions, but many
> computers are bought without IT's knowledge, and many departments do not
> have fully functional system imaging programs.  Manually reinstalling
> Windows is very expensive, and this configuration option will result in
> dozens or hundreds of manual Windows reinstalls.
>
> * 250MB hard disk on a desktop.  Upgrading the configuration to
> something more reasonable would be very inexpensive; why limit it
> unnecessarily?
>
> --
> Tom Holub ([hidden email], 510-642-9069)
> Director of Computing, College of Letters & Science
> 101.D Durant Hall
> <http://LSCR.berkeley.edu/>
>
>
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>
> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
> visit the Micronet Web site:
>
> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>
> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
> means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
> prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>



 
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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

Rune Stromsness
In reply to this post by Tom Holub
On 29-Feb-12 21:46, Tom Holub wrote:
[...]

>> As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
>> frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.
>
> What will the process be for deciding what the campus needs are?  My
> group brought up a number of concerns during the initial configuration
> phase of this project, and it doesn't appear that our concerns have been
> reflected in the recommended configurations.
>
> Those concerns include:
>
> * Windows Home.  Yes, we have licensing for workable versions, but many
> computers are bought without IT's knowledge, and many departments do not
> have fully functional system imaging programs.  Manually reinstalling
> Windows is very expensive, and this configuration option will result in
> dozens or hundreds of manual Windows reinstalls.
>
> * 250MB hard disk on a desktop.  Upgrading the configuration to
> something more reasonable would be very inexpensive; why limit it
> unnecessarily?
>
In the OE forum on this topic that I attended they were talking about
targeting 90% of campus workstations bought in-standard with exceptions
for up to 10%.  The FAQ doesn't currently say anything about how
exceptions are requested or granted.  I know that in my time on campus
I've had around 90% of desktops that could easily fit into standard,
vanilla systems.  But also had a number of systems that couldn't,
including things like:

* Network testing/troubleshooting workstations -- need to be as small
and simple to carry as possible to take to various closets, but also
need to have room for multiple 1 GE and 10 GE network cards as well as
having 1 TB or more of fairly high-performing disk for packet captures
while attempting to pinpoint the problem.
* Systems where expensive commercial software requires a full-height
add-in card that has a licensing function.
* Workstations for staff who had to do video editing on a regular basis
and needed lots of disk, multiple firewire connections for digital
cameras and tape decks, lots of RAM, etc.
* Workstations that needed add-in cards for controlling lighting
controllers or a number of MIDI devices.
* Workstations used for significant CAD work that needed lots of RAM and
usually dual high-end processors.

None of those were academic or research related.

Are there any details on what the exception process will look like?

Rune
--
Rune Stromsness
Network Operations & Services
Information Services and Technology
University of California, Berkeley
[hidden email]


 
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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

Johnathon P. Kogelman
In reply to this post by Johnathon P. Kogelman
As of this morning, it appears that Lenovo was pulled from the BearBuy categories. It seems we are being forced to use Dell as the PC vendor, I must of missed this part of the announcement.

On 3/1/12 8:30 AM, Johnathon P. Kogelman wrote:
We purchase AppleCare on all Apple systems anyway; we don't have the
staffing nor time to try to sort out which computers are or are not
covered under extended warranty.

The concern I have is the default Windows (aka Dell) pricing, which is
high compared to the Dell's small business store or Lenovo desktop
computers. A perfect example would be the Lenovo M71 SFF desktop we order
now costs $680.00; similar spec & warranty except we use the i3 processor.

While I understand most savings will probably come from the streamlined
ordering, less administrative time purchasing computers, etc. One would
think the combined purchasing power from UCB & UCSF could of forced Dell
into much better deals per unit.

On 2/29/12 8:02 PM, [hidden email] wrote:
2. Pricing for all UCB bundles include automatic enrollment in AppleCare
for 3 years.
Is that really wise?  It seems unlikely that it makes financial sense to
spend $183 for two years of depot coverage on an $1100 system.  If our
failure rate in years 2+3 is less than one in six (which seems likely),
we'd be better off buying 15% more laptops, putting them in storage and
using them to replace the ones that break.

The AppleCare Parts Agreement has more reasonable pricing than the full
AppleCare package; access to APA would be a potential benefit of a
program like this.

As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.
What will the process be for deciding what the campus needs are?  My
group brought up a number of concerns during the initial configuration
phase of this project, and it doesn't appear that our concerns have been
reflected in the recommended configurations.

Those concerns include:

* Windows Home.  Yes, we have licensing for workable versions, but many
computers are bought without IT's knowledge, and many departments do not
have fully functional system imaging programs.  Manually reinstalling
Windows is very expensive, and this configuration option will result in
dozens or hundreds of manual Windows reinstalls.

* 250MB hard disk on a desktop.  Upgrading the configuration to
something more reasonable would be very inexpensive; why limit it
unnecessarily?

--
Tom Holub ([hidden email], 510-642-9069)
Director of Computing, College of Letters & Science
101.D Durant Hall
<http://LSCR.berkeley.edu/>


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Re: [Micronet] UC Berkeley and UCSF Announce Joint Administrative Computing Standardization (JACS) Program

Greg Merritt
For those allowed to purchase outside of the new program, such as research units, I'd think that most any vendor can still be used, Lenovo or otherwise.

-Greg



On Mar 2, 2012, at 9:48 AM, Johnathon P. Kogelman wrote:

> As of this morning, it appears that Lenovo was pulled from the BearBuy categories. It seems we are being forced to use Dell as the PC vendor, I must of missed this part of the announcement.
>
> On 3/1/12 8:30 AM, Johnathon P. Kogelman wrote:
>> We purchase AppleCare on all Apple systems anyway; we don't have the
>> staffing nor time to try to sort out which computers are or are not
>> covered under extended warranty.
>>
>> The concern I have is the default Windows (aka Dell) pricing, which is
>> high compared to the Dell's small business store or Lenovo desktop
>> computers. A perfect example would be the Lenovo M71 SFF desktop we order
>> now costs $680.00; similar spec & warranty except we use the i3 processor.
>>
>> While I understand most savings will probably come from the streamlined
>> ordering, less administrative time purchasing computers, etc. One would
>> think the combined purchasing power from UCB & UCSF could of forced Dell
>> into much better deals per unit.
>>
>>
>>> On 2/29/12 8:02 PM, [hidden email]
>>>  wrote:
>>>
>>>> 2. Pricing for all UCB bundles include automatic enrollment in AppleCare
>>>> for 3 years.
>>>>
>>> Is that really wise?  It seems unlikely that it makes financial sense to
>>> spend $183 for two years of depot coverage on an $1100 system.  If our
>>> failure rate in years 2+3 is less than one in six (which seems likely),
>>> we'd be better off buying 15% more laptops, putting them in storage and
>>> using them to replace the ones that break.
>>>
>>> The AppleCare Parts Agreement has more reasonable pricing than the full
>>> AppleCare package; access to APA would be a potential benefit of a
>>> program like this.
>>>
>>>
>>>> As we said in the announcement, we will be refreshing the standards
>>>> frequently to ensure they meet the needs of our campus.
>>>>
>>> What will the process be for deciding what the campus needs are?  My
>>> group brought up a number of concerns during the initial configuration
>>> phase of this project, and it doesn't appear that our concerns have been
>>> reflected in the recommended configurations.
>>>
>>> Those concerns include:
>>>
>>> * Windows Home.  Yes, we have licensing for workable versions, but many
>>> computers are bought without IT's knowledge, and many departments do not
>>> have fully functional system imaging programs.  Manually reinstalling
>>> Windows is very expensive, and this configuration option will result in
>>> dozens or hundreds of manual Windows reinstalls.
>>>
>>> * 250MB hard disk on a desktop.  Upgrading the configuration to
>>> something more reasonable would be very inexpensive; why limit it
>>> unnecessarily?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Tom Holub (
>>> [hidden email]
>>> , 510-642-9069)
>>> Director of Computing, College of Letters & Science
>>> 101.D Durant Hall
>>>
>>> <http://LSCR.berkeley.edu/>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> The following was automatically added to this message by the list server:
>>>
>>> To learn more about Micronet, including how to subscribe to or unsubscribe
>>> from its mailing list and how to find out about upcoming meetings, please
>>> visit the Micronet Web site:
>>>
>>>
>>> http://micronet.berkeley.edu
>>>
>>>
>>> Messages you send to this mailing list are public and world-viewable, and
>>> the list's archives can be browsed and searched on the Internet.  This
>>> means these messages can be viewed by (among others) your bosses,
>>> prospective employers, and people who have known you in the past.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>  
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>>
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>>
>>
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>>
>
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